Women’s Soccer Wins First Home Game

By Hanna Kim
The women’s soccer team is hitting the road this weekend to play Austin College on Friday and Centenary College, conference newcomers, on Sunday.

The ladies won their first home game against Howard Payne University last Tuesday with a final score of 1-0. First-year Ashley Moulder scored the team’s winning goal in the first few minutes of the second half.

“Our team gained a lot of momentum this weekend and now know the kind of effort and and intensity needed to go forth and show what we’re capable of as a team. This win is just a start for what’s to come,” said senior captain Lyndsey Resnik.

The team played two home games last weekend losing to the University of Dallas 1-2 last Sunday and Trinity 0-5 last Saturday. Senior Captain Sarah Nonaka believes these two games helped to prepare the team for last Tuesday’s win.

“Although the results from last weekend were disappointing, I believe they played an integral part in our win tonight. It is so important to learn as much as you can from every aspect of each game, good and bad in order to improve throughout the season” Nonaka said.

Jene Baclawski, head coach of the team, also keeps a positive outlook about the remainder of the season.

“The biggest thing for the girls is just pride and not giving them anything easy,” Baclawski said.

Freshman Kirsten Mazur plays center back on the team and was looking forward to playing at home last weekend.

“Everyone is excited to have home games. A lot of people are hopefully going to be there and the energy will really help us,” Kirsten Mazur said.

The women’s soccer team currently holds a record of 2-8 overall and 0-2 in conference. Despite losses, Nonaka expresses hope for future conference games.

“Hopefully with this non-conference win going into the second week of conference, we have begun to establish faith in the future and the continued success of our team for the remainder of the season,” Nonaka said.

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Endangered Species Faces Opposition

By Alec Bergerson

The Georgetown Salamander, a local amphibian only found in this area, is currently in the process of being listed as an endangered species. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services (FWS) is now in the public hearing phase of this process and facing opposition from local residents and developers.

Dr. Joshua Long, an assistant professor of environmental studies at the university, has attended some of the public proceedings that address this conflict.

“There is a significant degree of legal protection afforded to species and their habitat under the Endangered Species Act (ESA),” Long said. “Once a candidate species is listed as endangered, the FWS undergoes a process of determining which activities may jeopardize the survival of the species.”

Local projects and construction may conflict with the policies of the ESA.

“This might mean that certain actions associated with development projects could cause harm to the species.This concerns many officials in Williamson County, because the county is one of the fastest growing in the state, and there may be certain restrictions that would ostensibly delay development projects seen as major priorities for the county,” Long said.

The potential endangered listing of the salamander may not necessarily hinder locals, because there are ways the ESA can assist them.

“It is extremely important to note that, as the ESA has evolved over the years, several programs have emerged that afford protection to landowners and developers. In some cases, this can include economic incentives to encourage conservation,” Long said.

If the FWS lists the salamander as endangered, there may be more environmental regulations that could be beneficial to the area. Local residents and officials, however, have expressed concern about the increased governmental regulation under the ESA.

“It’s true that the listing of the salamander and any designation of critical habitat might mean more environmental regulations and bureaucracy, and that’s something that concerns Williamson County residents,” Long said. “But some of those same restrictions and regulations that slow the development process could potentially facilitate a ‘greener’ and more sustainable style of development in Williamson County.”

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New Student Organizations: Students Establish Four Groups


By Joana Moreno

The university’s fall semester begins with a new record in student initiatives. Unlike previous years in which SU founded only one or two new groups, this year four new student organizations have established themselves and are looking for members.

Tau Sigma is a national honor society designed specifically for transfer students. The group focuses on recognizing and promoting the academic excellence and involvement of transfer students. The organization was co-founded by junior David Boutte, a transfer student himself.

“This is a quote about how lovely and wonderful the transfer students are and how much we would love to add them to our society,” Boutte said.

For those students passionate about economics, the Southwestern University Economics Club focuses on U.S. economics and what one can do with an economics degree after college. Sessions often include professor support and long-term thinking.

“It’s an excellent outlet to discuss economics concepts,” junior economics and business double major Brooke Chatterton said.

Trouvères is all about poetry. They focus on exploring poetry in multiple aspects, from writing it to discussing it, all while appreciating it. The organization has already hosted a poetry writing workshop and plans to sponsor spoken word artist Anis Mojgani and a poetry reading/open mike event later in the semester.

“I joined the club in order to motivate myself to write more outside of classes,” junior Jacob Brown said. “There’s no better way to get involved in writing for pleasure than to immerse yourself in a community that does the same. My ambition for the club is that it will someday produce works of visual poetry that students, faculty and visitors of the campus can enjoy.”

FACE AIDS is an awareness and fundraising group that focuses on global health equity, specifically dealing with HIV/AIDS. Leaders from the group began to promote their organization last spring and are enthusiastic about actively working for this cause in the new academic year.

“[FACE AIDS] functions to empower the youth to get up and make a lasting, positive difference in their world,” junior biology major Michelle Moses said.

The increase and variety of organizations speaks well of Southwestern’s student-driven atmosphere.
“One of the best things about Southwestern is that, if there’s not an organization that fits your needs, we’re willing to start new ones,” Assistant Director of Student Activities Jason Chapman said.

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Spanish Film Series Concludes Next Week

By Jennifer Fleming

The Spanish Film Festival is an international film event sponsored by Sigma Delta Pi, and Latinos Unidos. The festival will conclude Oct. 4 in Olin 105 at 8:00 p.m. with the last of five movies, Chico & Rita.

“It’s interesting to see other cultural approaches to media. These movies couldn’t be made in America,” Mckenna Cowley said. “And I’m not sure there are many American films that have as powerful an effect as Contracorriente, last week’s film, did.”

Spanish department chair Katy Ross helped organize the ongoing Spanish Film Club series, a program supported by Pragda, the Secretary of State for Culture of Spain, and Spain’s Program for Cultural Cooperation with United States’ University.

“The Festival’s purpose is to introduce students to the cultures of Spanish speaking countries,” Ross said. “The whole thing has been a group effort.”

This year, the series has spread to 43 Universities in the United States and Canada with each school choosing a particular theme. Southwestern’s team chose ‘Cinematic Sexuality/Sexualidad Cinematica’ to connect with the upcoming Brown Symposium.

“I found out about the international event and then pulled together Sigma Delta Pi and Latinos Unidos to organize a series on campus,” Ross said. “I discovered a company that does the work getting film rights and titles for us, and then we all watched the trailers and together chose five movies to show.”

Four movies were shown throughout September, but Chico & Rita will be the final showing for the year. Ross worked within the university to spread news of the events, but gives credit to the two groups for making the festival happen.
“I don’t consider myself the creator of this event,” Ross said. “Credit should go to Sigma Delta Pi and Latinos Unidos.”

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Tech Titans: Apple vs. Samsung


HARMFUL
By Carly Banner

In August, a decision in the case Apple v. Samsung was reached. Apple was awarded $1.05 billion in damages through the overzealous pursuit of patent protection.

If companies like Apple continue to pursue their patent rights so vigorously, this could be the first of many cases in which a large, successful technology company is allowed to stifle progress and competition. This practice is dangerous to the American consumer and the American economy, and it shows that there is a pressing need for greater regulation on which concepts can and should be patented.

The patents Apple contended included the homescreen and app display, pinch zooming, bouncing at the end of a scrolled page, and a square shape with rounded corners. Intangible concepts like these should not be possible to patent under U.S. law.

The great American dream is to come up from nothing, work hard or be smart enough to develop a new, desirable product, and reap the monetary rewards. Apple has set a precedent of blocking the path of the entrepreneur with patents and lawsuits over technicalities that smaller companies wouldn’t be able to afford to legally battle.

But now Apple has reached a time in which greed and monopoly over the market is slowing innovation. Apple is too busy squabbling over rounded corners and patent infringement to recognize that more can be accomplished by sharing new ideas and building on them than by hoarding them away.

In 2011, iPhone sales grew 142 percent, and iPad sales grew 183 percent. Apple’s 2011 record third quarter net profit was 7.31 billion. Clearly, Apple will have an abundance of income regardless of Samsung’s success. But if there is no less expensive alternative in the market, Apple will be free to jack up prices to its heart’s content.
If roadblocks like Apple’s patenting of minute details and general ideas becomes a common practice, making a start and moving forward in the American economy will become even more difficult. And if companies like Samsung are edged out of the game, there will be no competition, no drive to make a superior product. And that would be a disservice to technology consumers.

BENEFICIAL
Jennifer Fleming
In August, a decision in the case Apple v. Samsung was reached. Apple was awarded $1.05 billion in damages through the overzealous pursuit of patent protection.

If companies like Apple continue to pursue their patent rights so vigorously, this could be the first of many cases in which a large, successful technology company is allowed to stifle progress and competition. This practice is dangerous to the American consumer and the American economy, and it shows that there is a pressing need for greater regulation on which concepts can and should be patented.

The patents Apple contended included the homescreen and app display, pinch zooming, bouncing at the end of a scrolled page, and a square shape with rounded corners. Intangible concepts like these should not be possible to patent under U.S. law.

The great American dream is to come up from nothing, work hard or be smart enough to develop a new, desirable product, and reap the monetary rewards. Apple has set a precedent of blocking the path of the entrepreneur with patents and lawsuits over technicalities that smaller companies wouldn’t be able to afford to legally battle.

But now Apple has reached a time in which greed and monopoly over the market is slowing innovation. Apple is too busy squabbling over rounded corners and patent infringement to recognize that more can be accomplished by sharing new ideas and building on them than by hoarding them away.

In 2011, iPhone sales grew 142 percent, and iPad sales grew 183 percent. Apple’s 2011 record third quarter net profit was 7.31 billion. Clearly, Apple will have an abundance of income regardless of Samsung’s success. But if there is no less expensive alternative in the market, Apple will be free to jack up prices to its heart’s content.
If roadblocks like Apple’s patenting of minute details and general ideas becomes a common practice, making a start and moving forward in the American economy will become even more difficult. And if companies like Samsung are edged out of the game, there will be no competition, no drive to make a superior product. And that would be a disservice to technology consumers.

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Boesak Discusses Justice, Peace: Wilson Lecture Hosts Anti-Apartheid Leader

Rev. Dr. Allan Boesak speaks at the Wilson Lecture on Oct.4. Photo by Olivia Stephenson

By Devin Corbitt

Chair of the Western Cape region of the African National Conference; President of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches; founder of the United Democratic Front; and leader of South Africa’s anti-apartheid movement: these are just a few of the many accomplishments achieved throughout the life of Rev. Dr. Allan Boesak. He currently serves as an Extraordinary Professor of Public Theology at the University of Stellenbosch and chair of the Advisory Council of the Trans-Atlantic Roundtable on Religion and Race.

Boesak was invited to speak as the feature of this year’s Wilson Lecture. He delivered the morning’s chapel address, entitled “Quietly Bringing Justice.” He was introduced by Dr. Walt Herbert, Professor Emeritus of Southwestern.

“I trust you will find Allan’s message inspiring and instructive,” Herbert said. “It is an honor to welcome him to Southwestern.”

That afternoon, Boesak gave a lecture on “‘The Glory that is not Steeped in Blood’: War and Peace in a Globalized World”. His focus revolved around the causes and solutions to war in our current society.

“The presence of war is the one enduring constant in the developing history of the human kind, it seems,” Boesak said. “E­ven as enlightened science brought us new possibilities for meaningful life such as we have never seen before, our capacity for creating death has become even more resourceful.”

Boesak rejects the notion of war being the answer to conflict, preferring instead a more peaceful approach.

“I enter this discussion as a Christian liberation theologian from the global South,” Boesak said. “The tradition I revere and try to live by is a tradition of non-violence, even in resistance. I do not believe that violence, in the long run, can offer any lasting solution.”

In keeping with his anti-apartheid views, Boesak discussed historical wars through the lens of colonialism and racism. Through this, Boesak endeavored to show that war, in its most basic form, is apt to do more harm than good.

“The exterminations of the so-called ‘lower races’ were seen as a biological, political and economic necessity. And in these wars of brutality, accountability and proportionate response, our so-called measure of strength, did not exist. From early on in modern times, colonial wars were the experimental field of extinction.”

Boesak argues that it is impossible to hide the truths of war, especially in an era so rich in technology.The only solution, in his opinion, is to end war altogether and move toward a peaceful state in which equality reigns.

“In a globalized world, it is no longer possible to fully hide the consequences of war,” Boesak said. “We must, in communities and within and among nations, continue to encourage the search for non-violent solutions to vexing problems. All you have to do is to bring justice, even quietly.”
Boesak’s visit was sponsored by the Departments of History, Political Science, and Religion; the International Studies Program; the Golabal Citizens Fund; the Slover Fund and the Wilson Lectureship.

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National Hazing Prevention Week Comes to Close

Signs like the one above were posted around campus to raise awareness about hazing prevention.

By Colin Malone

National Hazing Prevention Week (NHPW) ties up today after five days and two events focused around spreading knowledge about hazing and preventing it. Jason Chapman, Assistant Director of Student Activities, organized the events.

“When people talk about hazing, it’s not the most interesting thing,” Chapman said. “So the goal isn’t just to educate students about it, but to do it in an entertaining way instead of just lecturing them.”

Monday opened the week with a panel discussion featuring Republican Candidate for Georgetown District Attorney, Jana Duty; former University of Texas basketball player and co-host of The Game on 104.9 ESPN Radio, J.D. Lewis; and Destiny McKinney, Director of Campus Life at Huston-Tillotson University.

“You can get six months to a year in jail [for hazing], and if it results in a death you’re looking at a felony,” Duty said. “But if you come forward and report it, you can be exempt from prosecution, even if you were a participant.”

The panel attendees included sorority and fraternity members and leaders.

“We average about 45 attendees each time we hold a panel event, and those are mostly organization members,” Chapman said. “But we have more people attending this year because of our relationships between Student Activities and the organization leaders.”

Thursday followed with a screening of the documentary Unless a Death Occurs, a program about Walter Dean Jennings, a Plattsburgh State University College freshman who died because of fraternity hazing.

“I worked with several leaders of the Greek groups here on campus to decide how to get hazing information out to students,” Chapman said. “We have a Hazing Prohibition Notice that every organization has to review during a meeting and have each member sign, saying that they have received that information.”

Hazing laws are state-determined, and each Texas school works within its hazing statutes to develop their own procedures.
“We work within the Texan hazing statute and expand on it to make it easier for our students to understand and follow,” Chapman said. “The amount of people aware of the dangers of hazing has surely grown through NHPW, and those people are more comfortable with reporting hazing because of it.”

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Friends, Fans, Families Show Support: Power Up Pirates Weekend Celebrate Athletics

Numerous supporters, including family, friends and alumni, attended the various athletic events and activities during the Power Up Pirates and Fall Family Days weekend . Photo by Erica Grant


By Marin Bramblett

Family, fans, and prospective students donned their yellow and black in school spirit for the Power Up Pirates, Family Weekend, and Prospective Student-Athlete events last Saturday.With all of the events taking place and the extra people on campus, the students, faculty, and family were feeling the excitement.

Audrey Helburn is a sophomore soccer player for the women’s team. She hoped that the presence of extra support at campus events would intimidate their rivals at their upcoming games.

“We want to put some fear into the other team. Fans inspire the team. There is an ebb and flow to a game and fans help us come out of tougher spots,” Helburn said.

Helburn was glad her parents came to campus for the game and that they got to experience the excitement of the weekend and hopes that prospective athletes felt it, too.
Abbey Petrecca is a full-time athletic trainer who attends to the injuries of many school athletes. In the Athletic Training room, amongst a steady flow of athletes and coaches, Petrecca taped ankles and ran STEM machines.

“I am excited about the fans at the games. There is a different type of energy – better energy, enthusiastic energy. Athletes draw off this energy, and as an athletic trainer, I can see it. It’s contagious at big weekends,” said Petrecca

Power Up Pirates, Family Weekend, and Prospective Athlete Day brought more than just fans. Jamie Meshew, the new Assistant Women’s Soccer Coach, saw what the weekend did for athletes first hand.

“It brought positive energy to campus. Southwestern has so much to offer. It’s a great weekend to see all of Southwestern – get the full picture,” Meshew said. “Plus, it’s great weather!”

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Men’s Soccer Makes Comeback

Junior Matthew Nickell prepares to pass the ball to his teamates during the team's match versus Colorado College last Friday. Photo by Kate Satel

By John Stickels

The men’s soccer team will face Austin College on Friday, followed by a trip to Centenary College in Louisiana on Sunday. This will be the first time the Pirates play these teams this season.

Last weekend the men’s team hosted Colorado College and the University of Dallas to open conference play. After losing the first game to Colorado College 4-0 on Friday, the men overcame a 1-0 halftime deficit on Sunday to beat Dallas 2-1, scoring their two goals in the first 15 minutes of the second half.

“The win was very satisfactory because although we did not play our best, we pulled out a win. It was a good rebound from the game against Colorado last Friday,” said junior Steven Resnik.

Senior Evan Perkins scored the equalizing goal in the first few minutes of the second half. The Pirates took the lead fifteen minutes later when junior Timothy Eamma scored the game-winning goal.

“It was great to finally win a home game. We are nearly perfect on the road and for us to come out and win was awesome. It is great to see so many fans come out to support us,” said junior Dane Beyer.

The Pirates have an overall record of 6-4, and are looking forward to the rest of the season. Senior Captain Forrest Baker notes that his team’s strength lays in the overall quality and skill of all the members on the team.

“We have a lot of very good players, we’re strong all around, and we have a lot of depth,” Baker said.

Due to the conference’s new calender, the Pirates will play their rival team, Trinity, twice this season, with the first game being at home on October 6th. The Pirates already have wins against Hardin-Simmons, UT-Dallas, and the University of Redlands (CA).

“We definitely have a chance to win the conference this season,” senior captain Evan Perkins said. “If we stay together and play the way we’ve been playing, we’ll be very good.”

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UPC Showcases FNL Events: Students Perform in the Friday Lineup

Sarah Cook plays her guitar in the Cove for a FNL event. The lineupthis semester includes student performers in addition to a variety of other acts. Photo by Elissa Graham

By Olivia Stephenson

Sophomore Sarah Cook performed with her guitar and ukulele in front of a cheering crowd of supporters. Cook’s performance was one of many student talent showcases that the University Planning Council (UPC) will feature throughout the semester as part of the new Friday Night Live (FNL) series.

UPC made the choice to combine the Cove Concerts series and Friday Night Live events in an effort to present shows that cater to the interests of the students.

The incorporation of the Cove Concert Series allows student performers to have a larger audience and more publicity with the support of UPC. Students will perform at the SU Showcase event in October.

So far, the entertainment that has occurred this semester has drawn large numbers of attendees due to the lineup and the personal involvement of the student body.

The performers this semester have include the bluegrass country group “Whiskey Shivers”, indie-folk singer Dana Falconberry, comedian Wil Sylvince, and Sarah Cook.

The remaining acts will include a variety of events including a slam poet, the Step and Stroll Exhibition, and the annual Casino Night.

“We’re really excited about this semester’s lineup because it was chosen completely by students,” Assistant Director of Student Activities Lisa De la Cruz said. “A survey was taken this summer, and students’ top choices are represented, for the most part. I think Garfunkel and Oates [female musical comedy duo] are definitely the most anticipated act.”

“UPC always works incredibly hard to find a variety of performers who will cater to the student body’s different preferences and tastes-and this year is no exception,” Daniel Dumitru, member of UPC’s executive council, said. “From spoken word artists, to a step and stroll exhibition, to magicians, we have it all this year. Those who come to Friday Night Live events will be far from disappointed.”

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