Office of the Provost

Faculty Notables

December 2013

  • Thomas McClendon, professor of history, attended the annual meeting of the African Studies Association Nov. 21-24 in Baltimore. He presented a paper, co-authored with Professor Pamela Scully of Emory University,  on “South African Students and the U.S. Anti-Apartheid Movement in the 1980s: Activism and Opportunity,” as part of a panel on “Apartheid Migration and Anti-Apartheid Activism in Southern Africa.” He also served as discussant for a panel on “Scholars, Photographers and Chiefs: The Uses and Constructions of Zuluness.”

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communication studies, presented a co-authored paper at the National Communication Association annual conference in Washington, D.C., in November. The paper, which was titled “Unmasking the Football Fraternity: A Burkean Analysis of the Penn State Sex Crimes,” was named one of the Top Four papers by the Kenneth Burke Society division of the conference.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, gave a talk at Bielefeld University in Germany titled “Spaces and Places of (Im)Possibility and Desire: Transversal Revolutionary Imaginaries in the 20th Century Americas” and led a faculty/graduate student workshop on his work, “Local Stories−Global Impact? The Role of Stories and Imaginaries in Revolutions since the 19th Century.”

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, recently received a $25,927 grant from the Williamson County Conservation Foundation for research on the ecology of the Georgetown salamander. Over the past four years, Pierce has received a total of $104,069 for his research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Anwar Sounny-Slitine, instructor of environmental studies and GIS lab manager, co-authored an article titled “A new longitudinal approach to assess hydrologic connectivity: Embanked floodplain inundation along the lower Mississippi River” that was published in a recent issue of the journal Hydrological Processes. The article looked at hydrologic connectivity in the lower Mississippi floodplain. Sounny-Slitine and his colleagues utilized GIS and LiDAR to create hydrological models which estimated the longitudinal channel bank profile, enabling a detailed examination of embanked floodplain hydrologic connectivity. The results of the investigation shed new light on the topic of hydrologic connectivity for an important embanked fluvial system that has previously received little attention concerning its physical floodplain processes. Read more here.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, reviewed Hal Brands’ book, Latin America’s Cold War, for the Bulletin of Latin American Research. Read the review here.

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, gave a lecture on “Moteuczoma’s Fame in Three Dimensions: Sign, Speech and Portrait in Tenochtitlan” at UT-Austin Nov. 13. Hajovsky is giving the same lecture at Southwestern Nov. 18 at noon in the Merzbach Room. Read more here. Hajovsky is the author of an upcoming book tentatively titled Moteuczoma, On the Lips of Others: Sculpture, Ritual and Fame in Tenochtitlan that will be published by UT Press.

  • Romi Burks, professor of biology, and Therese Shelton, associate professor of mathematics, had an article titled “Count Your Eggs Before They Invade: Identifying and Quantifying Egg Clutches of Two Invasive Apple Snail Species (Pomacea)” published in the online journal PLOS ONE. Former students Allyson Plantz and Colin Kylewere co-authors on the paper. Read the article here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, participated as an invited reviewer at the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Collections and References Resources Grant Program in Washington, D.C.

  • Feminist, Queer, Crip, the new book by Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, will be highlighted during this weekend’s National Women’s Studies Association conference in Cincinnati. Kafer’s work will be the focus of an “Authors Meet Critics” session, which is designed to bring authors of recent cutting-edge books deemed to be important contributions to the field of women’s studies together with discussants chosen to provide a variety of viewpoints. Read more here. Earlier this week, Kafer spoke about the book with Professor Matt Richardson’s graduate seminar on queer theory at UT-Austin. 

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, presented a paper titled “Moteuczoma-Tezcatlipoca-Xiuhtecuhtli: Invisibility and Visibility in Aztec Sculpture and Ritual,” at the 4th Annual South Central Conference on Mesoamerica, which was held at the University of Houston Nov. 1-3.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, participated in the 38th annual conference of the Coalition of Women in German (WIG) in Shawnee on Delaware, Pa., Oct. 24-27. Berroth led three professional development workshops, organized and moderated a panel on “Erlkönigs Töchter: Witches and Ghosts in German Literature and Film,” and collaborated in selecting the 2013 winner of the Women in German Dissertation Prize. She was appointed to chair the Dissertation Prize Committee in the coming year. The WIG membership also voted to sponsor Berroth’s proposal to organize and moderate a panel on “Eco-Pedagogy and Feminist Praxis in Modern Languages and Literatures” at the 2014 conference of the American Council for Teaching Foreign Languages  (ACTFL) and the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) that will be held in San Antonio next November.

  • Three Music Department faculty members were featured at the College Music Society National Conference held in Cambridge, Mass., Oct. 30-Nov. 2. Jason Hoogerhyde, associate professor of music, had his piano trio, Canopy of Night, performed by the Trio Florida on one of the CMS New Music Concerts. Kiyoshi Tamagawa, professor of music, presented a paper titled “The Sing-It-Yourself Messiah: A Particular Kind of Community Engagement,” and Eileen Meyer Russell, associate professor of music, presented a paper titled “Civic Engagement and the Applied Music Studio.” 

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, has been named a Research Fellow at the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communications studies, authored an article titled “Critical/Cultural Scholarship and the Responsibility for Building Theory: Enduring Criticism Revisited” that appeared in a recent special issue of the Western Journal of Communication.

  • Alison Marr, associate professor of mathematics, co-authored an article titled “Minimal Pancyclic Graphs” that appeared in a recent issue of the Journal of Combinatorial Mathematics and Combinatorial Computing.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, co-authored an article titled “Toward Sustainable Educational Travel” that appeared in a recent issue of the Journal of Sustainable Tourism. He also co-authored an article titled “A Broad Spectrum: Sustainability in Educational Travel” that appeared in a recent issue of theJournal of Sustainability in Higher Education.

  • Michael Kamen, associate professor of education, co-authored a chapter titled “Exploring Innovative Schools with Preservice Teachers,” which appears in The Routledge International Handbook of Innovation Education. Kamen wrote the chapter with Debbie Shepherd from the Meridian School in Round Rock.

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, published hisHistorical Dictionary of Romantic Music with The Scarecrow Press.

  • Davi Thornton, associate professor of communication studies, had an essay titled “The Rhetoric of Civil Rights Photographs: James Meredith’s March Against Fear” published in the fall 2013 issue of the journal Rhetoric & Public Affairs.

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, was the invited speaker for Scholars Day at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in Belton. The title of his talk was “The Ecology and Natural History of the Georgetown Salamander.” The talk included the contributions of Southwestern University undergraduate students who have assisted with research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Barbara Anthony, assistant professor of computer science, and Alison Marr, assistant professor of mathematics, gave presentations at CombinaTexas 2013: Combinatorics in the South-Central U.S. held at University of Houston-Downtown April 20. Marr’s talk was titled “Some notes on prime labeling” and Anthony’s talk was titled “Complete r-partite graphs determined by their domination polynomial.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, has a new book out with Indiana University Press titledFeminist, Queer, Crip. Read more about it here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, was invited by the Chicano and Latino Studies Department and the Jewish Studies Program of California State University Long Beach to give an April 25 talk titled “Allies in the Struggle for Civil Rights: Mexican American and Jewish Relations in a Time of Change.”

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, was one of approximately 20 humanities scholars across the United States who have been invited to attend High Performance Sound Technologies in Access and Scholarship (HiPSTAS), an Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Humanities funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, at UT-Austin May 29 - June1. Tahmahkera’s project entails constructing a digital archive and index for early 20th century American Indian audio recordings currently housed at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. More information about HiPSTAS is available at blogs.ischool.utexas.edu/hipstas/.

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, had an article published last week in Indian Country Today about Oklahoma Choctaw musician Samantha Crain. Tahmahkera interviewed Crain for his second book called Sounds Indigenous, which is in progress. Read the article here

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, published “Yentl, Me and 1983” in Lilith Blog. Read it here

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, was invited to Rollins College to give a talk as part of a conceptual lecture series called “The Heist: Community, Identity, and Meaning in the New Millenium” sponsored by the African and Aftrican-American Studies program. Mariotti’s April 16 presentation was the final event in the series and was devoted to the theme of “The Witness.” She presented a paper that read the novelist Marilynne Robinson through the lens of political theory to show how both storytelling and political theorizing can perform the act of “witnessing” the “crimes” of conventional society, with a focus on exclusionary gender norms and racial injustices.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, presented a paper titled “Teaching Sustainable Food & Agriculture at the Undergraduate Level” at the 2013 Association of American Geographers Conference in Los Angeles April 12.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German and chair of the Chinese, French and German Programs, participated in “Teaching the Animal: A Workshop for Humanities Professors,” which was held April 11-13 at Sewanee: The University of the South. Lectures and discussions were led by internationally recognized scholars including Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, and Dorothee Brantz from the Center of Metropolitan Studies in Berlin. Through small group discussions, reflection and shared planning, the workshop guided humanities faculty in incorporating units on animal-human relationships into courses and in developing courses in the growing interdisciplinary field of animal studies. The courses Berroth cross-lists with Environmental Studies integrate interdisciplinary themes, methods and perspectives on cultural differences regarding real animals, as well as representations of animals in texts, films, visual arts and popular culture.

November 2013

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, recently received a $25,927 grant from the Williamson County Conservation Foundation for research on the ecology of the Georgetown salamander. Over the past four years, Pierce has received a total of $104,069 for his research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Anwar Sounny-Slitine, instructor of environmental studies and GIS lab manager, co-authored an article titled “A new longitudinal approach to assess hydrologic connectivity: Embanked floodplain inundation along the lower Mississippi River” that was published in a recent issue of the journal Hydrological Processes. The article looked at hydrologic connectivity in the lower Mississippi floodplain. Sounny-Slitine and his colleagues utilized GIS and LiDAR to create hydrological models which estimated the longitudinal channel bank profile, enabling a detailed examination of embanked floodplain hydrologic connectivity. The results of the investigation shed new light on the topic of hydrologic connectivity for an important embanked fluvial system that has previously received little attention concerning its physical floodplain processes. Read more here.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, reviewed Hal Brands’ book, Latin America’s Cold War, for the Bulletin of Latin American Research. Read the review here.

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, gave a lecture on “Moteuczoma’s Fame in Three Dimensions: Sign, Speech and Portrait in Tenochtitlan” at UT-Austin Nov. 13. Hajovsky is giving the same lecture at Southwestern Nov. 18 at noon in the Merzbach Room. Read more here. Hajovsky is the author of an upcoming book tentatively titled Moteuczoma, On the Lips of Others: Sculpture, Ritual and Fame in Tenochtitlan that will be published by UT Press.

  • Romi Burks, professor of biology, and Therese Shelton, associate professor of mathematics, had an article titled “Count Your Eggs Before They Invade: Identifying and Quantifying Egg Clutches of Two Invasive Apple Snail Species (Pomacea)” published in the online journal PLOS ONE. Former students Allyson Plantz and Colin Kylewere co-authors on the paper. Read the article here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, participated as an invited reviewer at the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Collections and References Resources Grant Program in Washington, D.C.

  • Feminist, Queer, Crip, the new book by Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, will be highlighted during this weekend’s National Women’s Studies Association conference in Cincinnati. Kafer’s work will be the focus of an “Authors Meet Critics” session, which is designed to bring authors of recent cutting-edge books deemed to be important contributions to the field of women’s studies together with discussants chosen to provide a variety of viewpoints. Read more here. Earlier this week, Kafer spoke about the book with Professor Matt Richardson’s graduate seminar on queer theory at UT-Austin. 

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, presented a paper titled “Moteuczoma-Tezcatlipoca-Xiuhtecuhtli: Invisibility and Visibility in Aztec Sculpture and Ritual,” at the 4th Annual South Central Conference on Mesoamerica, which was held at the University of Houston Nov. 1-3.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, participated in the 38th annual conference of the Coalition of Women in German (WIG) in Shawnee on Delaware, Pa., Oct. 24-27. Berroth led three professional development workshops, organized and moderated a panel on “Erlkönigs Töchter: Witches and Ghosts in German Literature and Film,” and collaborated in selecting the 2013 winner of the Women in German Dissertation Prize. She was appointed to chair the Dissertation Prize Committee in the coming year. The WIG membership also voted to sponsor Berroth’s proposal to organize and moderate a panel on “Eco-Pedagogy and Feminist Praxis in Modern Languages and Literatures” at the 2014 conference of the American Council for Teaching Foreign Languages  (ACTFL) and the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) that will be held in San Antonio next November.

  • Three Music Department faculty members were featured at the College Music Society National Conference held in Cambridge, Mass., Oct. 30-Nov. 2. Jason Hoogerhyde, associate professor of music, had his piano trio, Canopy of Night, performed by the Trio Florida on one of the CMS New Music Concerts. Kiyoshi Tamagawa, professor of music, presented a paper titled “The Sing-It-Yourself Messiah: A Particular Kind of Community Engagement,” and Eileen Meyer Russell, associate professor of music, presented a paper titled “Civic Engagement and the Applied Music Studio.” 

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, has been named a Research Fellow at the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communications studies, authored an article titled “Critical/Cultural Scholarship and the Responsibility for Building Theory: Enduring Criticism Revisited” that appeared in a recent special issue of the Western Journal of Communication.

  • Alison Marr, associate professor of mathematics, co-authored an article titled “Minimal Pancyclic Graphs” that appeared in a recent issue of the Journal of Combinatorial Mathematics and Combinatorial Computing.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, co-authored an article titled “Toward Sustainable Educational Travel” that appeared in a recent issue of the Journal of Sustainable Tourism. He also co-authored an article titled “A Broad Spectrum: Sustainability in Educational Travel” that appeared in a recent issue of theJournal of Sustainability in Higher Education.

  • Michael Kamen, associate professor of education, co-authored a chapter titled “Exploring Innovative Schools with Preservice Teachers,” which appears in The Routledge International Handbook of Innovation Education. Kamen wrote the chapter with Debbie Shepherd from the Meridian School in Round Rock.

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, published hisHistorical Dictionary of Romantic Music with The Scarecrow Press.

  • Davi Thornton, associate professor of communication studies, had an essay titled “The Rhetoric of Civil Rights Photographs: James Meredith’s March Against Fear” published in the fall 2013 issue of the journal Rhetoric & Public Affairs.

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, was the invited speaker for Scholars Day at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in Belton. The title of his talk was “The Ecology and Natural History of the Georgetown Salamander.” The talk included the contributions of Southwestern University undergraduate students who have assisted with research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Barbara Anthony, assistant professor of computer science, and Alison Marr, assistant professor of mathematics, gave presentations at CombinaTexas 2013: Combinatorics in the South-Central U.S. held at University of Houston-Downtown April 20. Marr’s talk was titled “Some notes on prime labeling” and Anthony’s talk was titled “Complete r-partite graphs determined by their domination polynomial.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, has a new book out with Indiana University Press titledFeminist, Queer, Crip. Read more about it here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, was invited by the Chicano and Latino Studies Department and the Jewish Studies Program of California State University Long Beach to give an April 25 talk titled “Allies in the Struggle for Civil Rights: Mexican American and Jewish Relations in a Time of Change.”

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, was one of approximately 20 humanities scholars across the United States who have been invited to attend High Performance Sound Technologies in Access and Scholarship (HiPSTAS), an Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Humanities funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, at UT-Austin May 29 - June1. Tahmahkera’s project entails constructing a digital archive and index for early 20th century American Indian audio recordings currently housed at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. More information about HiPSTAS is available at blogs.ischool.utexas.edu/hipstas/.

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, had an article published last week in Indian Country Today about Oklahoma Choctaw musician Samantha Crain. Tahmahkera interviewed Crain for his second book called Sounds Indigenous, which is in progress. Read the article here

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, published “Yentl, Me and 1983” in Lilith Blog. Read it here

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, was invited to Rollins College to give a talk as part of a conceptual lecture series called “The Heist: Community, Identity, and Meaning in the New Millenium” sponsored by the African and Aftrican-American Studies program. Mariotti’s April 16 presentation was the final event in the series and was devoted to the theme of “The Witness.” She presented a paper that read the novelist Marilynne Robinson through the lens of political theory to show how both storytelling and political theorizing can perform the act of “witnessing” the “crimes” of conventional society, with a focus on exclusionary gender norms and racial injustices.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, presented a paper titled “Teaching Sustainable Food & Agriculture at the Undergraduate Level” at the 2013 Association of American Geographers Conference in Los Angeles April 12.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German and chair of the Chinese, French and German Programs, participated in “Teaching the Animal: A Workshop for Humanities Professors,” which was held April 11-13 at Sewanee: The University of the South. Lectures and discussions were led by internationally recognized scholars including Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, and Dorothee Brantz from the Center of Metropolitan Studies in Berlin. Through small group discussions, reflection and shared planning, the workshop guided humanities faculty in incorporating units on animal-human relationships into courses and in developing courses in the growing interdisciplinary field of animal studies. The courses Berroth cross-lists with Environmental Studies integrate interdisciplinary themes, methods and perspectives on cultural differences regarding real animals, as well as representations of animals in texts, films, visual arts and popular culture.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, presented a paper at the recent International Studies Association meeting titled “‘Becoming’ IR: The Implications of a Storied IR” and also was a participant in a roundtable titled “Inquiry as Invention: Telling Stories in International Politics.” Selbin also co-chaired the annual meeting of the Editorial Board of Rowman & Littlefield’s book series New Millennium Books in International Studies which he co-edits.

  • Ken Roberts, professor of economics and holder of the Hugh Roy and Lille Cullen Chair in Economics, recently had an invited essay titled “Migration and Agrarian Change” published in the Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration (Blackwell Publishing, 2013).

  • Alisa Gaunder, associate professor of political science, was the panel discussant for “Comparative Issues” and the panel chair for “Undergraduate Research: Ethnic Issues and International Relations” at the Southwestern Political Science Association Meeting in New Orleans March 28-30.

October 2013

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, has been named a Research Fellow at the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communications studies, authored an article titled “Critical/Cultural Scholarship and the Responsibility for Building Theory: Enduring Criticism Revisited” that appeared in a recent special issue of the Western Journal of Communication.

  • Alison Marr, associate professor of mathematics, co-authored an article titled “Minimal Pancyclic Graphs” that appeared in a recent issue of the Journal of Combinatorial Mathematics and Combinatorial Computing.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, co-authored an article titled “Toward Sustainable Educational Travel” that appeared in a recent issue of the Journal of Sustainable Tourism. He also co-authored an article titled “A Broad Spectrum: Sustainability in Educational Travel” that appeared in a recent issue of theJournal of Sustainability in Higher Education.

  • Michael Kamen, associate professor of education, co-authored a chapter titled “Exploring Innovative Schools with Preservice Teachers,” which appears in The Routledge International Handbook of Innovation Education. Kamen wrote the chapter with Debbie Shepherd from the Meridian School in Round Rock.

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, published hisHistorical Dictionary of Romantic Music with The Scarecrow Press.

  • Davi Thornton, associate professor of communication studies, had an essay titled “The Rhetoric of Civil Rights Photographs: James Meredith’s March Against Fear” published in the fall 2013 issue of the journal Rhetoric & Public Affairs.

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, was the invited speaker for Scholars Day at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in Belton. The title of his talk was “The Ecology and Natural History of the Georgetown Salamander.” The talk included the contributions of Southwestern University undergraduate students who have assisted with research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Barbara Anthony, assistant professor of computer science, and Alison Marr, assistant professor of mathematics, gave presentations at CombinaTexas 2013: Combinatorics in the South-Central U.S. held at University of Houston-Downtown April 20. Marr’s talk was titled “Some notes on prime labeling” and Anthony’s talk was titled “Complete r-partite graphs determined by their domination polynomial.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, has a new book out with Indiana University Press titledFeminist, Queer, Crip. Read more about it here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, was invited by the Chicano and Latino Studies Department and the Jewish Studies Program of California State University Long Beach to give an April 25 talk titled “Allies in the Struggle for Civil Rights: Mexican American and Jewish Relations in a Time of Change.”

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, was one of approximately 20 humanities scholars across the United States who have been invited to attend High Performance Sound Technologies in Access and Scholarship (HiPSTAS), an Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Humanities funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, at UT-Austin May 29 - June1. Tahmahkera’s project entails constructing a digital archive and index for early 20th century American Indian audio recordings currently housed at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. More information about HiPSTAS is available at blogs.ischool.utexas.edu/hipstas/.

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, had an article published last week in Indian Country Today about Oklahoma Choctaw musician Samantha Crain. Tahmahkera interviewed Crain for his second book called Sounds Indigenous, which is in progress. Read the article here

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, published “Yentl, Me and 1983” in Lilith Blog. Read it here

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, was invited to Rollins College to give a talk as part of a conceptual lecture series called “The Heist: Community, Identity, and Meaning in the New Millenium” sponsored by the African and Aftrican-American Studies program. Mariotti’s April 16 presentation was the final event in the series and was devoted to the theme of “The Witness.” She presented a paper that read the novelist Marilynne Robinson through the lens of political theory to show how both storytelling and political theorizing can perform the act of “witnessing” the “crimes” of conventional society, with a focus on exclusionary gender norms and racial injustices.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, presented a paper titled “Teaching Sustainable Food & Agriculture at the Undergraduate Level” at the 2013 Association of American Geographers Conference in Los Angeles April 12.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German and chair of the Chinese, French and German Programs, participated in “Teaching the Animal: A Workshop for Humanities Professors,” which was held April 11-13 at Sewanee: The University of the South. Lectures and discussions were led by internationally recognized scholars including Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, and Dorothee Brantz from the Center of Metropolitan Studies in Berlin. Through small group discussions, reflection and shared planning, the workshop guided humanities faculty in incorporating units on animal-human relationships into courses and in developing courses in the growing interdisciplinary field of animal studies. The courses Berroth cross-lists with Environmental Studies integrate interdisciplinary themes, methods and perspectives on cultural differences regarding real animals, as well as representations of animals in texts, films, visual arts and popular culture.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, presented a paper at the recent International Studies Association meeting titled “‘Becoming’ IR: The Implications of a Storied IR” and also was a participant in a roundtable titled “Inquiry as Invention: Telling Stories in International Politics.” Selbin also co-chaired the annual meeting of the Editorial Board of Rowman & Littlefield’s book series New Millennium Books in International Studies which he co-edits.

  • Ken Roberts, professor of economics and holder of the Hugh Roy and Lille Cullen Chair in Economics, recently had an invited essay titled “Migration and Agrarian Change” published in the Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration (Blackwell Publishing, 2013).

  • Alisa Gaunder, associate professor of political science, was the panel discussant for “Comparative Issues” and the panel chair for “Undergraduate Research: Ethnic Issues and International Relations” at the Southwestern Political Science Association Meeting in New Orleans March 28-30.

  • David Gaines, associate professor of English, will be presenting “Bob Dylan, Mitch Miller, Brave Combo, and ‘Must Be Santa’” at the Experience Music Project Pop Conference in Seattle, Wash., April 20. The conference proceedings are being simulcast to conference venues in New York, Los Angeles, Cleveland and New Orleans.

  • Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, presented a paper titled “Slumlord with a Heart of Gold: What the Controversy over the Oliviers de Serres ‘Ghetto’ in Villeurbanne Reveals about Migrants’ Rights in the Republic” on April 6 at the Society for French Historical Studies Annual Conference in Cambridge, Mass. She also gave a talk titled “Migration and Municipal Foreign Policy: North Africans in the Suburbs of Paris and Lyon” at a workshop hosted by UT-Austin’s Institute for Historical Studies on April 15.

  • Sandi Nenga, associate professor of sociology, and Jessica Taft (Davidson College), just published a co-edited volume titled Youth Engagement: The Civic-Political Lives of Children and Youth. The volume brings together studies of children and youth’s activism and volunteer work. It is volume 16 in the series Sociological Studies of Children and Youth (Bingley, UK:  Emerald). 

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history, will present a new interpretation of the site of the ancient Roman villas he has been studying in Stabiae, Italy, at an international conference titled “Public and Private in the Roman House” that is being held in Helsinki, Finland, April 18-20. Read more here.

  • Math professors Rick DenmanFumiko Futamura and Kendall Richards published a paper titled “On sharp frame diagonalization” in the March issue of the journal Linear Algebra and its Applications.

  • Suzanne BucheleAlison Marr and Therese Shelton have been awarded a $4,000 Blended Learning Grant from the Associated Colleges of the South (ACS) for their proposal titled “Improved Calculus Preparation Through Assessment and Customized Blended Learning.” All three are associate professors in the Mathematics and Computer Science Department.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, wrote a review of The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture, vol. 1, Cheap Print in Britain and Ireland to 1660 that appeared in the most recent issue of Notes and Queries, a publication of Oxford University Press.

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, presented a paper titled “The Housekeeper of Homelessness: The Democratic Ethos of Marilynne Robinson’s Novels and Essays” at the Western Political Science Association conference in Hollywood, Calif., March 29.

  • Erin Crockett, assistant professor of psychology, and students Sara Goodman and Quinlyn Morrow are presenting posters this week at a meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in Fort Worth. Goodman is presenting a poster titled “Perceptions of dating in adolescence and self-esteem in emerging adulthood” and Morrow is presenting a poster titled “Associations between friendship gender composition and interdependence.”

  • Anwar Sounny-Slitine, instructor of environmental studies and GIS Lab Manager, has received a $10,500 Google education grant to install Google Earth Pro edition on 30 computers on campus that are used by students in GIS, Physics and other programs.

September 2013

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, was the invited speaker for Scholars Day at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in Belton. The title of his talk was “The Ecology and Natural History of the Georgetown Salamander.” The talk included the contributions of Southwestern University undergraduate students who have assisted with research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Barbara Anthony, assistant professor of computer science, and Alison Marr, assistant professor of mathematics, gave presentations at CombinaTexas 2013: Combinatorics in the South-Central U.S. held at University of Houston-Downtown April 20. Marr’s talk was titled “Some notes on prime labeling” and Anthony’s talk was titled “Complete r-partite graphs determined by their domination polynomial.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, has a new book out with Indiana University Press titledFeminist, Queer, Crip. Read more about it here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, was invited by the Chicano and Latino Studies Department and the Jewish Studies Program of California State University Long Beach to give an April 25 talk titled “Allies in the Struggle for Civil Rights: Mexican American and Jewish Relations in a Time of Change.”

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, was one of approximately 20 humanities scholars across the United States who have been invited to attend High Performance Sound Technologies in Access and Scholarship (HiPSTAS), an Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Humanities funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, at UT-Austin May 29 - June1. Tahmahkera’s project entails constructing a digital archive and index for early 20th century American Indian audio recordings currently housed at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. More information about HiPSTAS is available at blogs.ischool.utexas.edu/hipstas/.

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, had an article published last week in Indian Country Today about Oklahoma Choctaw musician Samantha Crain. Tahmahkera interviewed Crain for his second book called Sounds Indigenous, which is in progress. Read the article here

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, published “Yentl, Me and 1983” in Lilith Blog. Read it here

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, was invited to Rollins College to give a talk as part of a conceptual lecture series called “The Heist: Community, Identity, and Meaning in the New Millenium” sponsored by the African and Aftrican-American Studies program. Mariotti’s April 16 presentation was the final event in the series and was devoted to the theme of “The Witness.” She presented a paper that read the novelist Marilynne Robinson through the lens of political theory to show how both storytelling and political theorizing can perform the act of “witnessing” the “crimes” of conventional society, with a focus on exclusionary gender norms and racial injustices.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, presented a paper titled “Teaching Sustainable Food & Agriculture at the Undergraduate Level” at the 2013 Association of American Geographers Conference in Los Angeles April 12.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German and chair of the Chinese, French and German Programs, participated in “Teaching the Animal: A Workshop for Humanities Professors,” which was held April 11-13 at Sewanee: The University of the South. Lectures and discussions were led by internationally recognized scholars including Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, and Dorothee Brantz from the Center of Metropolitan Studies in Berlin. Through small group discussions, reflection and shared planning, the workshop guided humanities faculty in incorporating units on animal-human relationships into courses and in developing courses in the growing interdisciplinary field of animal studies. The courses Berroth cross-lists with Environmental Studies integrate interdisciplinary themes, methods and perspectives on cultural differences regarding real animals, as well as representations of animals in texts, films, visual arts and popular culture.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, presented a paper at the recent International Studies Association meeting titled “‘Becoming’ IR: The Implications of a Storied IR” and also was a participant in a roundtable titled “Inquiry as Invention: Telling Stories in International Politics.” Selbin also co-chaired the annual meeting of the Editorial Board of Rowman & Littlefield’s book series New Millennium Books in International Studies which he co-edits.

  • Ken Roberts, professor of economics and holder of the Hugh Roy and Lille Cullen Chair in Economics, recently had an invited essay titled “Migration and Agrarian Change” published in the Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration (Blackwell Publishing, 2013).

  • Alisa Gaunder, associate professor of political science, was the panel discussant for “Comparative Issues” and the panel chair for “Undergraduate Research: Ethnic Issues and International Relations” at the Southwestern Political Science Association Meeting in New Orleans March 28-30.

  • David Gaines, associate professor of English, will be presenting “Bob Dylan, Mitch Miller, Brave Combo, and ‘Must Be Santa’” at the Experience Music Project Pop Conference in Seattle, Wash., April 20. The conference proceedings are being simulcast to conference venues in New York, Los Angeles, Cleveland and New Orleans.

  • Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, presented a paper titled “Slumlord with a Heart of Gold: What the Controversy over the Oliviers de Serres ‘Ghetto’ in Villeurbanne Reveals about Migrants’ Rights in the Republic” on April 6 at the Society for French Historical Studies Annual Conference in Cambridge, Mass. She also gave a talk titled “Migration and Municipal Foreign Policy: North Africans in the Suburbs of Paris and Lyon” at a workshop hosted by UT-Austin’s Institute for Historical Studies on April 15.

  • Sandi Nenga, associate professor of sociology, and Jessica Taft (Davidson College), just published a co-edited volume titled Youth Engagement: The Civic-Political Lives of Children and Youth. The volume brings together studies of children and youth’s activism and volunteer work. It is volume 16 in the series Sociological Studies of Children and Youth (Bingley, UK:  Emerald). 

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history, will present a new interpretation of the site of the ancient Roman villas he has been studying in Stabiae, Italy, at an international conference titled “Public and Private in the Roman House” that is being held in Helsinki, Finland, April 18-20. Read more here.

  • Math professors Rick DenmanFumiko Futamura and Kendall Richards published a paper titled “On sharp frame diagonalization” in the March issue of the journal Linear Algebra and its Applications.

  • Suzanne BucheleAlison Marr and Therese Shelton have been awarded a $4,000 Blended Learning Grant from the Associated Colleges of the South (ACS) for their proposal titled “Improved Calculus Preparation Through Assessment and Customized Blended Learning.” All three are associate professors in the Mathematics and Computer Science Department.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, wrote a review of The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture, vol. 1, Cheap Print in Britain and Ireland to 1660 that appeared in the most recent issue of Notes and Queries, a publication of Oxford University Press.

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, presented a paper titled “The Housekeeper of Homelessness: The Democratic Ethos of Marilynne Robinson’s Novels and Essays” at the Western Political Science Association conference in Hollywood, Calif., March 29.

  • Erin Crockett, assistant professor of psychology, and students Sara Goodman and Quinlyn Morrow are presenting posters this week at a meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in Fort Worth. Goodman is presenting a poster titled “Perceptions of dating in adolescence and self-esteem in emerging adulthood” and Morrow is presenting a poster titled “Associations between friendship gender composition and interdependence.”

  • Anwar Sounny-Slitine, instructor of environmental studies and GIS Lab Manager, has received a $10,500 Google education grant to install Google Earth Pro edition on 30 computers on campus that are used by students in GIS, Physics and other programs.

  • Brenda Sendejo, assistant professor of anthropology, presented a paper titled “Activist Pedagogies as Resistance: Promoting Social Change from the Borderlands of Chicana/o Studies and Anthropology” at the National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies annual conference in San Antonio March 20-23.

  • Patricia Schiaffini, instructor of Chinese, delivered a paper titled “The Language Debate in Sinophone Tibetan Literature: Cultural Authenticity, Audience, and Representation” at a roundtable on “Critical Conversations in Sinophone Studies” at the Annual Conference of the Association for Asian Studies in San Diego March 21-24.

  • Angeles Rodriguez Cadena, assistant professor of Spanish, attended a seminar on the history of mass media in Latin America at the University of Buenos Aires while she is on sabbatical in Buenos Aires this semester. She also participated in a workshop on “Memory and Education” at the Haroldo Conti Cultural Center for Social Memory, which is housed at a facility that functioned as a concentration camp in the 1970s during Argentina’s military dictatorship. The workshop provided an opportunity to interact with educators, community leaders, artists and students who are creating opportunities for the production and promotion of the culture of memory and human rights through art, education, literature, culture and politics. She said she plans to incorporate what she has learned this semester in the Contemporary Latin American Literature class she will be teaching in the fall, and in her Cultural Memory in Latin America class that participates in Paideia.

  • Elisabeth Piedmont-Marton, associate professor of English, presented a paper titled “The Limits of Liberal Literacy Pedagogies in a Global Context: Lessons from Vietnam” on a panel called Questioning English Instruction Abroad and at Home at the 2013 Conference on College Composition and Communication held March 13-16 in Las Vegas. At the conference she saw Southwestern graduate Sarah Hart, who completed her Ph.D. in August and is teaching as an adjunct at Colorado State and working on a book project based on her dissertation on rhetoric and poetry.

  • Melissa Johnson, associate professor of anthropology, was invited to participate in a one-day conference on Race, Place and Nature that was held at Rutgers University March 8 as part of a year-long Sawyer Seminar on Race, Place and Space in the Americas. Johnson presented a paper titled “Racing Nature in a Creolized World: Race, Color and Nature in Belize.”

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, presented a paper titled “Language learners in interaction: Orientation to novice and expert identities” at the Dialogue in Multilingual, Multimodal, and Multicompetent Communities of Practice Workshop in Austin March 22-24.

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, has completed work on the Historical Dictionary of Romantic Music. The book will be published this fall by Scarecrow Press as part of their series titled Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts. 

August 2013

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, was the invited speaker for Scholars Day at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in Belton. The title of his talk was “The Ecology and Natural History of the Georgetown Salamander.” The talk included the contributions of Southwestern University undergraduate students who have assisted with research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Barbara Anthony, assistant professor of computer science, and Alison Marr, assistant professor of mathematics, gave presentations at CombinaTexas 2013: Combinatorics in the South-Central U.S. held at University of Houston-Downtown April 20. Marr’s talk was titled “Some notes on prime labeling” and Anthony’s talk was titled “Complete r-partite graphs determined by their domination polynomial.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, has a new book out with Indiana University Press titledFeminist, Queer, Crip. Read more about it here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, was invited by the Chicano and Latino Studies Department and the Jewish Studies Program of California State University Long Beach to give an April 25 talk titled “Allies in the Struggle for Civil Rights: Mexican American and Jewish Relations in a Time of Change.”

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, was one of approximately 20 humanities scholars across the United States who have been invited to attend High Performance Sound Technologies in Access and Scholarship (HiPSTAS), an Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Humanities funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, at UT-Austin May 29 - June1. Tahmahkera’s project entails constructing a digital archive and index for early 20th century American Indian audio recordings currently housed at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. More information about HiPSTAS is available at blogs.ischool.utexas.edu/hipstas/.

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, had an article published last week in Indian Country Today about Oklahoma Choctaw musician Samantha Crain. Tahmahkera interviewed Crain for his second book called Sounds Indigenous, which is in progress. Read the article here

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, published “Yentl, Me and 1983” in Lilith Blog. Read it here

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, was invited to Rollins College to give a talk as part of a conceptual lecture series called “The Heist: Community, Identity, and Meaning in the New Millenium” sponsored by the African and Aftrican-American Studies program. Mariotti’s April 16 presentation was the final event in the series and was devoted to the theme of “The Witness.” She presented a paper that read the novelist Marilynne Robinson through the lens of political theory to show how both storytelling and political theorizing can perform the act of “witnessing” the “crimes” of conventional society, with a focus on exclusionary gender norms and racial injustices.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, presented a paper titled “Teaching Sustainable Food & Agriculture at the Undergraduate Level” at the 2013 Association of American Geographers Conference in Los Angeles April 12.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German and chair of the Chinese, French and German Programs, participated in “Teaching the Animal: A Workshop for Humanities Professors,” which was held April 11-13 at Sewanee: The University of the South. Lectures and discussions were led by internationally recognized scholars including Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, and Dorothee Brantz from the Center of Metropolitan Studies in Berlin. Through small group discussions, reflection and shared planning, the workshop guided humanities faculty in incorporating units on animal-human relationships into courses and in developing courses in the growing interdisciplinary field of animal studies. The courses Berroth cross-lists with Environmental Studies integrate interdisciplinary themes, methods and perspectives on cultural differences regarding real animals, as well as representations of animals in texts, films, visual arts and popular culture.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, presented a paper at the recent International Studies Association meeting titled “‘Becoming’ IR: The Implications of a Storied IR” and also was a participant in a roundtable titled “Inquiry as Invention: Telling Stories in International Politics.” Selbin also co-chaired the annual meeting of the Editorial Board of Rowman & Littlefield’s book series New Millennium Books in International Studies which he co-edits.

  • Ken Roberts, professor of economics and holder of the Hugh Roy and Lille Cullen Chair in Economics, recently had an invited essay titled “Migration and Agrarian Change” published in the Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration (Blackwell Publishing, 2013).

  • Alisa Gaunder, associate professor of political science, was the panel discussant for “Comparative Issues” and the panel chair for “Undergraduate Research: Ethnic Issues and International Relations” at the Southwestern Political Science Association Meeting in New Orleans March 28-30.

  • David Gaines, associate professor of English, will be presenting “Bob Dylan, Mitch Miller, Brave Combo, and ‘Must Be Santa’” at the Experience Music Project Pop Conference in Seattle, Wash., April 20. The conference proceedings are being simulcast to conference venues in New York, Los Angeles, Cleveland and New Orleans.

  • Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, presented a paper titled “Slumlord with a Heart of Gold: What the Controversy over the Oliviers de Serres ‘Ghetto’ in Villeurbanne Reveals about Migrants’ Rights in the Republic” on April 6 at the Society for French Historical Studies Annual Conference in Cambridge, Mass. She also gave a talk titled “Migration and Municipal Foreign Policy: North Africans in the Suburbs of Paris and Lyon” at a workshop hosted by UT-Austin’s Institute for Historical Studies on April 15.

  • Sandi Nenga, associate professor of sociology, and Jessica Taft (Davidson College), just published a co-edited volume titled Youth Engagement: The Civic-Political Lives of Children and Youth. The volume brings together studies of children and youth’s activism and volunteer work. It is volume 16 in the series Sociological Studies of Children and Youth (Bingley, UK:  Emerald). 

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history, will present a new interpretation of the site of the ancient Roman villas he has been studying in Stabiae, Italy, at an international conference titled “Public and Private in the Roman House” that is being held in Helsinki, Finland, April 18-20. Read more here.

  • Math professors Rick DenmanFumiko Futamura and Kendall Richards published a paper titled “On sharp frame diagonalization” in the March issue of the journal Linear Algebra and its Applications.

  • Suzanne BucheleAlison Marr and Therese Shelton have been awarded a $4,000 Blended Learning Grant from the Associated Colleges of the South (ACS) for their proposal titled “Improved Calculus Preparation Through Assessment and Customized Blended Learning.” All three are associate professors in the Mathematics and Computer Science Department.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, wrote a review of The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture, vol. 1, Cheap Print in Britain and Ireland to 1660 that appeared in the most recent issue of Notes and Queries, a publication of Oxford University Press.

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, presented a paper titled “The Housekeeper of Homelessness: The Democratic Ethos of Marilynne Robinson’s Novels and Essays” at the Western Political Science Association conference in Hollywood, Calif., March 29.

  • Erin Crockett, assistant professor of psychology, and students Sara Goodman and Quinlyn Morrow are presenting posters this week at a meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in Fort Worth. Goodman is presenting a poster titled “Perceptions of dating in adolescence and self-esteem in emerging adulthood” and Morrow is presenting a poster titled “Associations between friendship gender composition and interdependence.”

  • Anwar Sounny-Slitine, instructor of environmental studies and GIS Lab Manager, has received a $10,500 Google education grant to install Google Earth Pro edition on 30 computers on campus that are used by students in GIS, Physics and other programs.

  • Brenda Sendejo, assistant professor of anthropology, presented a paper titled “Activist Pedagogies as Resistance: Promoting Social Change from the Borderlands of Chicana/o Studies and Anthropology” at the National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies annual conference in San Antonio March 20-23.

  • Patricia Schiaffini, instructor of Chinese, delivered a paper titled “The Language Debate in Sinophone Tibetan Literature: Cultural Authenticity, Audience, and Representation” at a roundtable on “Critical Conversations in Sinophone Studies” at the Annual Conference of the Association for Asian Studies in San Diego March 21-24.

  • Angeles Rodriguez Cadena, assistant professor of Spanish, attended a seminar on the history of mass media in Latin America at the University of Buenos Aires while she is on sabbatical in Buenos Aires this semester. She also participated in a workshop on “Memory and Education” at the Haroldo Conti Cultural Center for Social Memory, which is housed at a facility that functioned as a concentration camp in the 1970s during Argentina’s military dictatorship. The workshop provided an opportunity to interact with educators, community leaders, artists and students who are creating opportunities for the production and promotion of the culture of memory and human rights through art, education, literature, culture and politics. She said she plans to incorporate what she has learned this semester in the Contemporary Latin American Literature class she will be teaching in the fall, and in her Cultural Memory in Latin America class that participates in Paideia.

  • Elisabeth Piedmont-Marton, associate professor of English, presented a paper titled “The Limits of Liberal Literacy Pedagogies in a Global Context: Lessons from Vietnam” on a panel called Questioning English Instruction Abroad and at Home at the 2013 Conference on College Composition and Communication held March 13-16 in Las Vegas. At the conference she saw Southwestern graduate Sarah Hart, who completed her Ph.D. in August and is teaching as an adjunct at Colorado State and working on a book project based on her dissertation on rhetoric and poetry.

  • Melissa Johnson, associate professor of anthropology, was invited to participate in a one-day conference on Race, Place and Nature that was held at Rutgers University March 8 as part of a year-long Sawyer Seminar on Race, Place and Space in the Americas. Johnson presented a paper titled “Racing Nature in a Creolized World: Race, Color and Nature in Belize.”

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, presented a paper titled “Language learners in interaction: Orientation to novice and expert identities” at the Dialogue in Multilingual, Multimodal, and Multicompetent Communities of Practice Workshop in Austin March 22-24.

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, has completed work on the Historical Dictionary of Romantic Music. The book will be published this fall by Scarecrow Press as part of their series titled Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts. 

May 2013

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, was the invited speaker for Scholars Day at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in Belton. The title of his talk was “The Ecology and Natural History of the Georgetown Salamander.” The talk included the contributions of Southwestern University undergraduate students who have assisted with research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Barbara Anthony, assistant professor of computer science, and Alison Marr, assistant professor of mathematics, gave presentations at CombinaTexas 2013: Combinatorics in the South-Central U.S. held at University of Houston-Downtown April 20. Marr’s talk was titled “Some notes on prime labeling” and Anthony’s talk was titled “Complete r-partite graphs determined by their domination polynomial.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, has a new book out with Indiana University Press titledFeminist, Queer, Crip. Read more about it here.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, was invited by the Chicano and Latino Studies Department and the Jewish Studies Program of California State University Long Beach to give an April 25 talk titled “Allies in the Struggle for Civil Rights: Mexican American and Jewish Relations in a Time of Change.”

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, was one of approximately 20 humanities scholars across the United States who have been invited to attend High Performance Sound Technologies in Access and Scholarship (HiPSTAS), an Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Humanities funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, at UT-Austin May 29 - June1. Tahmahkera’s project entails constructing a digital archive and index for early 20th century American Indian audio recordings currently housed at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. More information about HiPSTAS is available at blogs.ischool.utexas.edu/hipstas/.

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, had an article published last week in Indian Country Today about Oklahoma Choctaw musician Samantha Crain. Tahmahkera interviewed Crain for his second book called Sounds Indigenous, which is in progress. Read the article here

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, published “Yentl, Me and 1983” in Lilith Blog. Read it here

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, was invited to Rollins College to give a talk as part of a conceptual lecture series called “The Heist: Community, Identity, and Meaning in the New Millenium” sponsored by the African and Aftrican-American Studies program. Mariotti’s April 16 presentation was the final event in the series and was devoted to the theme of “The Witness.” She presented a paper that read the novelist Marilynne Robinson through the lens of political theory to show how both storytelling and political theorizing can perform the act of “witnessing” the “crimes” of conventional society, with a focus on exclusionary gender norms and racial injustices.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, presented a paper titled “Teaching Sustainable Food & Agriculture at the Undergraduate Level” at the 2013 Association of American Geographers Conference in Los Angeles April 12.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German and chair of the Chinese, French and German Programs, participated in “Teaching the Animal: A Workshop for Humanities Professors,” which was held April 11-13 at Sewanee: The University of the South. Lectures and discussions were led by internationally recognized scholars including Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, and Dorothee Brantz from the Center of Metropolitan Studies in Berlin. Through small group discussions, reflection and shared planning, the workshop guided humanities faculty in incorporating units on animal-human relationships into courses and in developing courses in the growing interdisciplinary field of animal studies. The courses Berroth cross-lists with Environmental Studies integrate interdisciplinary themes, methods and perspectives on cultural differences regarding real animals, as well as representations of animals in texts, films, visual arts and popular culture.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, presented a paper at the recent International Studies Association meeting titled “‘Becoming’ IR: The Implications of a Storied IR” and also was a participant in a roundtable titled “Inquiry as Invention: Telling Stories in International Politics.” Selbin also co-chaired the annual meeting of the Editorial Board of Rowman & Littlefield’s book series New Millennium Books in International Studies which he co-edits.

  • Ken Roberts, professor of economics and holder of the Hugh Roy and Lille Cullen Chair in Economics, recently had an invited essay titled “Migration and Agrarian Change” published in the Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration (Blackwell Publishing, 2013).

  • Alisa Gaunder, associate professor of political science, was the panel discussant for “Comparative Issues” and the panel chair for “Undergraduate Research: Ethnic Issues and International Relations” at the Southwestern Political Science Association Meeting in New Orleans March 28-30.

  • David Gaines, associate professor of English, will be presenting “Bob Dylan, Mitch Miller, Brave Combo, and ‘Must Be Santa’” at the Experience Music Project Pop Conference in Seattle, Wash., April 20. The conference proceedings are being simulcast to conference venues in New York, Los Angeles, Cleveland and New Orleans.

  • Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, presented a paper titled “Slumlord with a Heart of Gold: What the Controversy over the Oliviers de Serres ‘Ghetto’ in Villeurbanne Reveals about Migrants’ Rights in the Republic” on April 6 at the Society for French Historical Studies Annual Conference in Cambridge, Mass. She also gave a talk titled “Migration and Municipal Foreign Policy: North Africans in the Suburbs of Paris and Lyon” at a workshop hosted by UT-Austin’s Institute for Historical Studies on April 15.

  • Sandi Nenga, associate professor of sociology, and Jessica Taft (Davidson College), just published a co-edited volume titled Youth Engagement: The Civic-Political Lives of Children and Youth. The volume brings together studies of children and youth’s activism and volunteer work. It is volume 16 in the series Sociological Studies of Children and Youth (Bingley, UK:  Emerald). 

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history, will present a new interpretation of the site of the ancient Roman villas he has been studying in Stabiae, Italy, at an international conference titled “Public and Private in the Roman House” that is being held in Helsinki, Finland, April 18-20. Read more here.

  • Math professors Rick DenmanFumiko Futamura and Kendall Richards published a paper titled “On sharp frame diagonalization” in the March issue of the journal Linear Algebra and its Applications.

  • Suzanne BucheleAlison Marr and Therese Shelton have been awarded a $4,000 Blended Learning Grant from the Associated Colleges of the South (ACS) for their proposal titled “Improved Calculus Preparation Through Assessment and Customized Blended Learning.” All three are associate professors in the Mathematics and Computer Science Department.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, wrote a review of The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture, vol. 1, Cheap Print in Britain and Ireland to 1660 that appeared in the most recent issue of Notes and Queries, a publication of Oxford University Press.

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, presented a paper titled “The Housekeeper of Homelessness: The Democratic Ethos of Marilynne Robinson’s Novels and Essays” at the Western Political Science Association conference in Hollywood, Calif., March 29.

  • Erin Crockett, assistant professor of psychology, and students Sara Goodman and Quinlyn Morrow are presenting posters this week at a meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in Fort Worth. Goodman is presenting a poster titled “Perceptions of dating in adolescence and self-esteem in emerging adulthood” and Morrow is presenting a poster titled “Associations between friendship gender composition and interdependence.”

  • Anwar Sounny-Slitine, instructor of environmental studies and GIS Lab Manager, has received a $10,500 Google education grant to install Google Earth Pro edition on 30 computers on campus that are used by students in GIS, Physics and other programs.

  • Brenda Sendejo, assistant professor of anthropology, presented a paper titled “Activist Pedagogies as Resistance: Promoting Social Change from the Borderlands of Chicana/o Studies and Anthropology” at the National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies annual conference in San Antonio March 20-23.

  • Patricia Schiaffini, instructor of Chinese, delivered a paper titled “The Language Debate in Sinophone Tibetan Literature: Cultural Authenticity, Audience, and Representation” at a roundtable on “Critical Conversations in Sinophone Studies” at the Annual Conference of the Association for Asian Studies in San Diego March 21-24.

  • Angeles Rodriguez Cadena, assistant professor of Spanish, attended a seminar on the history of mass media in Latin America at the University of Buenos Aires while she is on sabbatical in Buenos Aires this semester. She also participated in a workshop on “Memory and Education” at the Haroldo Conti Cultural Center for Social Memory, which is housed at a facility that functioned as a concentration camp in the 1970s during Argentina’s military dictatorship. The workshop provided an opportunity to interact with educators, community leaders, artists and students who are creating opportunities for the production and promotion of the culture of memory and human rights through art, education, literature, culture and politics. She said she plans to incorporate what she has learned this semester in the Contemporary Latin American Literature class she will be teaching in the fall, and in her Cultural Memory in Latin America class that participates in Paideia.

  • Elisabeth Piedmont-Marton, associate professor of English, presented a paper titled “The Limits of Liberal Literacy Pedagogies in a Global Context: Lessons from Vietnam” on a panel called Questioning English Instruction Abroad and at Home at the 2013 Conference on College Composition and Communication held March 13-16 in Las Vegas. At the conference she saw Southwestern graduate Sarah Hart, who completed her Ph.D. in August and is teaching as an adjunct at Colorado State and working on a book project based on her dissertation on rhetoric and poetry.

  • Melissa Johnson, associate professor of anthropology, was invited to participate in a one-day conference on Race, Place and Nature that was held at Rutgers University March 8 as part of a year-long Sawyer Seminar on Race, Place and Space in the Americas. Johnson presented a paper titled “Racing Nature in a Creolized World: Race, Color and Nature in Belize.”

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, presented a paper titled “Language learners in interaction: Orientation to novice and expert identities” at the Dialogue in Multilingual, Multimodal, and Multicompetent Communities of Practice Workshop in Austin March 22-24.

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, has completed work on the Historical Dictionary of Romantic Music. The book will be published this fall by Scarecrow Press as part of their series titled Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts. 

April 2013

  • Dustin Tahmahkera, assistant professor of communication studies, had an article published last week in Indian Country Today about Oklahoma Choctaw musician Samantha Crain. Tahmahkera interviewed Crain for his second book called Sounds Indigenous, which is in progress. Read the article here

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, published “Yentl, Me and 1983” in Lilith Blog. Read it here

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, was invited to Rollins College to give a talk as part of a conceptual lecture series called “The Heist: Community, Identity, and Meaning in the New Millenium” sponsored by the African and Aftrican-American Studies program. Mariotti’s April 16 presentation was the final event in the series and was devoted to the theme of “The Witness.” She presented a paper that read the novelist Marilynne Robinson through the lens of political theory to show how both storytelling and political theorizing can perform the act of “witnessing” the “crimes” of conventional society, with a focus on exclusionary gender norms and racial injustices.

  • Josh Long, assistant professor of environmental studies, presented a paper titled “Teaching Sustainable Food & Agriculture at the Undergraduate Level” at the 2013 Association of American Geographers Conference in Los Angeles April 12.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German and chair of the Chinese, French and German Programs, participated in “Teaching the Animal: A Workshop for Humanities Professors,” which was held April 11-13 at Sewanee: The University of the South. Lectures and discussions were led by internationally recognized scholars including Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, and Dorothee Brantz from the Center of Metropolitan Studies in Berlin. Through small group discussions, reflection and shared planning, the workshop guided humanities faculty in incorporating units on animal-human relationships into courses and in developing courses in the growing interdisciplinary field of animal studies. The courses Berroth cross-lists with Environmental Studies integrate interdisciplinary themes, methods and perspectives on cultural differences regarding real animals, as well as representations of animals in texts, films, visual arts and popular culture.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science and University Scholar, presented a paper at the recent International Studies Association meeting titled “‘Becoming’ IR: The Implications of a Storied IR” and also was a participant in a roundtable titled “Inquiry as Invention: Telling Stories in International Politics.” Selbin also co-chaired the annual meeting of the Editorial Board of Rowman & Littlefield’s book series New Millennium Books in International Studies which he co-edits.

  • Ken Roberts, professor of economics and holder of the Hugh Roy and Lille Cullen Chair in Economics, recently had an invited essay titled “Migration and Agrarian Change” published in the Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration (Blackwell Publishing, 2013).

  • Alisa Gaunder, associate professor of political science, was the panel discussant for “Comparative Issues” and the panel chair for “Undergraduate Research: Ethnic Issues and International Relations” at the Southwestern Political Science Association Meeting in New Orleans March 28-30.

  • David Gaines, associate professor of English, will be presenting “Bob Dylan, Mitch Miller, Brave Combo, and ‘Must Be Santa’” at the Experience Music Project Pop Conference in Seattle, Wash., April 20. The conference proceedings are being simulcast to conference venues in New York, Los Angeles, Cleveland and New Orleans.

  • Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, presented a paper titled “Slumlord with a Heart of Gold: What the Controversy over the Oliviers de Serres ‘Ghetto’ in Villeurbanne Reveals about Migrants’ Rights in the Republic” on April 6 at the Society for French Historical Studies Annual Conference in Cambridge, Mass. She also gave a talk titled “Migration and Municipal Foreign Policy: North Africans in the Suburbs of Paris and Lyon” at a workshop hosted by UT-Austin’s Institute for Historical Studies on April 15.

  • Sandi Nenga, associate professor of sociology, and Jessica Taft (Davidson College), just published a co-edited volume titled Youth Engagement: The Civic-Political Lives of Children and Youth. The volume brings together studies of children and youth’s activism and volunteer work. It is volume 16 in the series Sociological Studies of Children and Youth (Bingley, UK:  Emerald). 

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history, will present a new interpretation of the site of the ancient Roman villas he has been studying in Stabiae, Italy, at an international conference titled “Public and Private in the Roman House” that is being held in Helsinki, Finland, April 18-20. Read more here.

  • Math professors Rick DenmanFumiko Futamura and Kendall Richards published a paper titled “On sharp frame diagonalization” in the March issue of the journal Linear Algebra and its Applications.

  • Suzanne BucheleAlison Marr and Therese Shelton have been awarded a $4,000 Blended Learning Grant from the Associated Colleges of the South (ACS) for their proposal titled “Improved Calculus Preparation Through Assessment and Customized Blended Learning.” All three are associate professors in the Mathematics and Computer Science Department.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, wrote a review of The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture, vol. 1, Cheap Print in Britain and Ireland to 1660 that appeared in the most recent issue of Notes and Queries, a publication of Oxford University Press.

  • Shannon Mariotti, associate professor of political science, presented a paper titled “The Housekeeper of Homelessness: The Democratic Ethos of Marilynne Robinson’s Novels and Essays” at the Western Political Science Association conference in Hollywood, Calif., March 29.

  • Erin Crockett, assistant professor of psychology, and students Sara Goodman and Quinlyn Morrow are presenting posters this week at a meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in Fort Worth. Goodman is presenting a poster titled “Perceptions of dating in adolescence and self-esteem in emerging adulthood” and Morrow is presenting a poster titled “Associations between friendship gender composition and interdependence.”

  • Anwar Sounny-Slitine, instructor of environmental studies and GIS Lab Manager, has received a $10,500 Google education grant to install Google Earth Pro edition on 30 computers on campus that are used by students in GIS, Physics and other programs.

  • Brenda Sendejo, assistant professor of anthropology, presented a paper titled “Activist Pedagogies as Resistance: Promoting Social Change from the Borderlands of Chicana/o Studies and Anthropology” at the National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies annual conference in San Antonio March 20-23.

  • Patricia Schiaffini, instructor of Chinese, delivered a paper titled “The Language Debate in Sinophone Tibetan Literature: Cultural Authenticity, Audience, and Representation” at a roundtable on “Critical Conversations in Sinophone Studies” at the Annual Conference of the Association for Asian Studies in San Diego March 21-24.

  • Angeles Rodriguez Cadena, assistant professor of Spanish, attended a seminar on the history of mass media in Latin America at the University of Buenos Aires while she is on sabbatical in Buenos Aires this semester. She also participated in a workshop on “Memory and Education” at the Haroldo Conti Cultural Center for Social Memory, which is housed at a facility that functioned as a concentration camp in the 1970s during Argentina’s military dictatorship. The workshop provided an opportunity to interact with educators, community leaders, artists and students who are creating opportunities for the production and promotion of the culture of memory and human rights through art, education, literature, culture and politics. She said she plans to incorporate what she has learned this semester in the Contemporary Latin American Literature class she will be teaching in the fall, and in her Cultural Memory in Latin America class that participates in Paideia.

  • Elisabeth Piedmont-Marton, associate professor of English, presented a paper titled “The Limits of Liberal Literacy Pedagogies in a Global Context: Lessons from Vietnam” on a panel called Questioning English Instruction Abroad and at Home at the 2013 Conference on College Composition and Communication held March 13-16 in Las Vegas. At the conference she saw Southwestern graduate Sarah Hart, who completed her Ph.D. in August and is teaching as an adjunct at Colorado State and working on a book project based on her dissertation on rhetoric and poetry.

  • Melissa Johnson, associate professor of anthropology, was invited to participate in a one-day conference on Race, Place and Nature that was held at Rutgers University March 8 as part of a year-long Sawyer Seminar on Race, Place and Space in the Americas. Johnson presented a paper titled “Racing Nature in a Creolized World: Race, Color and Nature in Belize.”

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, presented a paper titled “Language learners in interaction: Orientation to novice and expert identities” at the Dialogue in Multilingual, Multimodal, and Multicompetent Communities of Practice Workshop in Austin March 22-24.

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, has completed work on the Historical Dictionary of Romantic Music. The book will be published this fall by Scarecrow Press as part of their series titled Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts. 

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, presented a research paper titled “Marica Bodrožić: Transnational Identity Narratives in Layers, Folds and Fractals” at the 44th annual convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association in Boston March 21-24. With this essay, part of a theory chapter in her book on transnational identity narratives by contemporary women writers, Berroth contributed to a double panel titled “The Eastern European Turn in Contemporary German-Language Literature” which brought together eight leading scholars on the topic from Europe and the United States. While at NeMLA, she also participated in expert discussions on “Blended Learning in Modern Languages and Literature Classrooms” and “Best Practices: Teaching Professional Communication in German.”

  • Maha Zewail-Foote, associate professor of chemistry, co-authored an article titled “Science for the ‘Haves’” that was published in the January issue of the international journal Angewandte Chemi. Read the article here.

  • Fred Sellers, associate professor of business, presented a paper titled “Dynegy Corporation: Inflating Operating Cash Flow” at the Southwest Regional Meeting of the American Accounting Association in Albuquerque, N.M., March 15.

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communication studies, attended the Western States Communication Association annual conference in Reno, Nev., Feb. 15-19. She was involved in two roundtable discussions to help emerging scholars develop their work through the publication process. She also presented a co-authored paper in the Rhetoric and Public Address division titled “Contradictions and Watersheds: Up in the Air with the Comic Frame.”

  • Herbert Genzmer, visiting assistant professor of German, has been invited to start writing a column for Entwürfe, a literary magazine from Zürich. The column is titled “Notes from America.” The first column, published March 7, was titled “Faith will help.”

March 2013

  • Anwar Sounny-Slitine, instructor of environmental studies and GIS Lab Manager, has received a $10,500 Google education grant to install Google Earth Pro edition on 30 computers on campus that are used by students in GIS, Physics and other programs.

  • Brenda Sendejo, assistant professor of anthropology, presented a paper titled “Activist Pedagogies as Resistance: Promoting Social Change from the Borderlands of Chicana/o Studies and Anthropology” at the National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies annual conference in San Antonio March 20-23.

  • Patricia Schiaffini, instructor of Chinese, delivered a paper titled “The Language Debate in Sinophone Tibetan Literature: Cultural Authenticity, Audience, and Representation” at a roundtable on “Critical Conversations in Sinophone Studies” at the Annual Conference of the Association for Asian Studies in San Diego March 21-24.

  • Angeles Rodriguez Cadena, assistant professor of Spanish, attended a seminar on the history of mass media in Latin America at the University of Buenos Aires while she is on sabbatical in Buenos Aires this semester. She also participated in a workshop on “Memory and Education” at the Haroldo Conti Cultural Center for Social Memory, which is housed at a facility that functioned as a concentration camp in the 1970s during Argentina’s military dictatorship. The workshop provided an opportunity to interact with educators, community leaders, artists and students who are creating opportunities for the production and promotion of the culture of memory and human rights through art, education, literature, culture and politics. She said she plans to incorporate what she has learned this semester in the Contemporary Latin American Literature class she will be teaching in the fall, and in her Cultural Memory in Latin America class that participates in Paideia.

  • Elisabeth Piedmont-Marton, associate professor of English, presented a paper titled “The Limits of Liberal Literacy Pedagogies in a Global Context: Lessons from Vietnam” on a panel called Questioning English Instruction Abroad and at Home at the 2013 Conference on College Composition and Communication held March 13-16 in Las Vegas. At the conference she saw Southwestern graduate Sarah Hart, who completed her Ph.D. in August and is teaching as an adjunct at Colorado State and working on a book project based on her dissertation on rhetoric and poetry.

  • Melissa Johnson, associate professor of anthropology, was invited to participate in a one-day conference on Race, Place and Nature that was held at Rutgers University March 8 as part of a year-long Sawyer Seminar on Race, Place and Space in the Americas. Johnson presented a paper titled “Racing Nature in a Creolized World: Race, Color and Nature in Belize.”

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, presented a paper titled “Language learners in interaction: Orientation to novice and expert identities” at the Dialogue in Multilingual, Multimodal, and Multicompetent Communities of Practice Workshop in Austin March 22-24.

  • Michael Cooper, professor of music and holder of the Margarett Root Brown Chair in Fine Arts, has completed work on the Historical Dictionary of Romantic Music. The book will be published this fall by Scarecrow Press as part of their series titled Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts. 

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German, presented a research paper titled “Marica Bodrožić: Transnational Identity Narratives in Layers, Folds and Fractals” at the 44th annual convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association in Boston March 21-24. With this essay, part of a theory chapter in her book on transnational identity narratives by contemporary women writers, Berroth contributed to a double panel titled “The Eastern European Turn in Contemporary German-Language Literature” which brought together eight leading scholars on the topic from Europe and the United States. While at NeMLA, she also participated in expert discussions on “Blended Learning in Modern Languages and Literature Classrooms” and “Best Practices: Teaching Professional Communication in German.”

  • Maha Zewail-Foote, associate professor of chemistry, co-authored an article titled “Science for the ‘Haves’” that was published in the January issue of the international journal Angewandte Chemi. Read the article here.

  • Fred Sellers, associate professor of business, presented a paper titled “Dynegy Corporation: Inflating Operating Cash Flow” at the Southwest Regional Meeting of the American Accounting Association in Albuquerque, N.M., March 15.

  • Valerie Renegar, associate professor of communication studies, attended the Western States Communication Association annual conference in Reno, Nev., Feb. 15-19. She was involved in two roundtable discussions to help emerging scholars develop their work through the publication process. She also presented a co-authored paper in the Rhetoric and Public Address division titled “Contradictions and Watersheds: Up in the Air with the Comic Frame.”

  • Herbert Genzmer, visiting assistant professor of German, has been invited to start writing a column for Entwürfe, a literary magazine from Zürich. The column is titled “Notes from America.” The first column, published March 7, was titled “Faith will help.”

  • Elaine Craddock, professor of religion, published an article titled “The Half Male, Half Female Servants of the Goddess Aṅkāḷaparamēcuvari” in the December 2012 issue of Nidān: Journal for the Study of Hinduism.

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, delivered a paper called “Chaste Polygamy and Victorian Sensation Fiction” at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) conference in Charlottesville, Va. , March 14-17.  The essay extends her current project on representations of Mormon marriage in Victorian literature, 1860-1870. While at INCS she also chaired a panel on British Romantic literature, and agreed to serve on the selection committee for the 2014 INCS conference hosted by the University of Houston.

  • Barbara Anthony, assistant professor of computer science, facilitated a Birds-of-a-Feather session on “Trends in CS Enrollment at Small, Liberal Arts Institutions” at the 2013 SIGCSE (Computer Science Education) Technical Symposium, “The Changing Face of Computing” in Denver, Colo., March 7-9. Suzanne Fox Buchele, associate professor of computer science, presented a paper at the same conference titled “Two Models of a Cryptography and Computer Security Class in a Liberal Arts Context.”

December 2012

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, delivered a paper at the North American Victorian Studies Association conference in Madison, Wis., Sept. 27-30. The paper, “Mormon Fever: Sensationalizing the Saints in Mrs. Henry Wood’s 1863 Verner’s Pride,” is part of a new research project about female domestic privacy within representations of Mormon polygamy.

  • Jesse Purdy, professor of psychology, is presenting a talk titled “Vertebrate Predators May Share Facial Characteristics Providing Opportunities for Detection by Prey” at the biannual meeting of the International Society of Comparative Psychologists, which is being held this week in Jaen, Spain.

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, recently had an article titled “Native Speaker/Nonnative Speaker Interaction and Orientation to Novice/Expert Identity” published in the Journal of Pragmatics.  

  • Maria Lowe, professor of sociology, and Reggie Byron, assistant professor of sociology, have had an article titled “Food for Thought: Frequent Interracial Dining Experiences as a Predictor of Students’ Racial Climate Perceptions,” accepted for publication in The Journal of Higher Education, the leading scholarly journal on the institution of higher education. Recent graduates Griffin Ferry and Melissa Garcia contributed to the paper.

  • Pianist Kiyoshi Tamagawa and several other members of the music faculty will be the featured performers in a Sept. 9 chamber music concert at the Cailloux Theater in Kerrville. The program will include a rarely performed version of Mozart’s Piano Concerto in D minor arranged for piano, flute, violin and cello by Mozart’s pupil and protégé, Johann Nepomuk Humel; the Quintet in F minor for piano and string quartet by Johannes Brahms; and the regional premiere of a brand new work for piano, violin and cello by Composer in Residence Jason Hoogerhyde. Read more here.   

  • Mary Hale Visser, professor of art and holder of the Herman Brown Chair, presented a paper on “Cybersculpture: materials, processes and the history of sculpture in the digital age” at the European Forum on Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing symposium held in Paris in June.

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, published an article in theSouthwestern Naturalist along with former students Tiffany BiagasAlex Hall and Alexis Ritzer.  The article is titled “Time of day does not affect detection in visual encounter surveys of a spring-dwelling salamander, Eurycea naufragia.” Pierce was recently awarded a third year of funding from the Williamson County Research Foundation for his research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, gave a paper on “The Algerian War through Metropolitan Prisms: How Ideas of Empire Shaped Local Immigration Policies and Policing” at the French Colonial Historical Society’s annual conference in New Orleans May 30-June 2.

  • Music Professor Lois Ferrari and the Austin Civic Orchestra have been named finalists for the 2012 American Prize in two categories: Orchestral Performance (Community Orchestra Division) and Conducting (Community Orchestra Division). Read more here.

  • Fay Guarraci, associate professor of psychology, and Maha Zewail-Foote, associate professor of chemistry, had a paper titled “Kin Discrimination in Prepubescent and Adult Long-Evans Rats” published in the July issue ofBehavioural Processes. Co-authors on the paper include former students Jessica BoltonAlex BurbyBrittany Ford and Carissa Winland.  

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, has published a chapter in a new book titled Seeing Across Cultures in the Early Modern World. His contribution is “Without a Face: Voicing Moctezuma II’s Image at Chapultepec Park, Mexico City.” The book was edited by Dana Leibsohn of Smith College and Jeanette Favrot Peterson of the University of California - Santa Barbara, both well-published scholars of Latin American art history. Read more here.

  • Katy Ross, associate professor of Spanish, presented a paper at the Congreso de la Asociación Hispánica de Humanidades in Madrid June 28-30.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German and chair of the Chinese, French and German Programs, presented her research at the Kentucky Foreign Language Conference in Lexington, Ky., April 19-22, 2012. Her paper titled “Das Wunder von Bern (2003): Cultures of Affect, Spectatorial Responses, Perceptions of History” contributed to a panel of scholars working on German history and film.

  • Two faculty members gave presentations at the Popular Culture/American Culture Association meeting in Boston April 11-12. Elisabeth Piedmont-Marton, associate professor of English, gave a paper titled “Moving Mountains: Karl Marlantes’s Matterhorn and the Canon of Vietnam War Literature” and David Gaines, associate professor of English, gave a presentation titled “A Dylan Fan’s Notes.”

  • Helene Meyers, Professor of English and McManis University Chair, presented “Here and/or Elsewhere: Locating Contemporary Jewish American Literature” at the annual conference of MELUS (the Society for the Study of the Multi-ethnic Literature of the United States). The paper explored the function of Holocaust and Israel narratives in feminist and queer Jewish American novels.  

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history, will present a paper titled “For Whom Did Vitruvius Write?” at a colloquium on Vitruvius being held in Einsiedeln, Switzerland, April 26-29. The paper combines his earlier work on a commentary and illustration of the Roman architect Vitruvius (Vitruvius, Ten Books on Architecture, with Ingrid Rowland, trans, Cambridge University Press, 1999) with his recent work on the architectural context of political activity in Republican Rome.

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, gave an invited talk at the University of Wisconsin-Madison April 17. Her talk, “Practicing Feminist, Queer, Crip,” was part of UW’s lecture series on disability studies and intersectionality. She gave a shorter version of this talk in February at the “Past, Present, and Future of Feminist Studies” conference at UC-Santa Barbara.

  • Steve Kostelnik, assistant professor of music, was one of several classical guitar players who participated in a recent “Views and Brews” program sponsored by KUT-FM at the Cactus Café in Austin. Listen to the show here.

  • The Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción did an interview with Laura Senio-Blair, associate professor of Spanish, who is teaching in Concepción this spring on a Fulbright Fellowship. Read the interview here.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, shared a paper in the seminar, “Shakespeare’s Theories of Translation” at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Boston April 5-7. 

  • Alisa Gaunder, associate professor of political science, presented a paper titled “The Effects of Party Organization on Women in the CDU and the LDP: Chancellors versus ‘Assassins’” at the Southwestern Political Science Association Meeting in San Diego, Calif., April 4-7.

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, has been selected to receive the Southwestern Partner of the Year Award from Georgetown Partners in Education. The award will be presented April 19 at Georgetown High School. Dings was one of several Southwestern faculty, staff and students who started a program in which Spanish III students mentor students at Mitchell Elementary School.

  • David Asbury, assistant professor of music, and Bruce Cain, associate professor of music, performed selections from their “River of Words” song cycle on the Kennedy Center’s Millenium Stage last week. Watch a recording of the performance here.

  • Allison Miller, assistant professor of art history, presented a paper at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies held in Toronto, Canada, March 16. The paper was titled “Monumental Rock-Cut Tombs and Political Self-Fashioning and Han China,” and was included on a panel that she co-organized and chaired titled “Contested Space: New Research on the Tombs of the Chinese Ruling Elite.”

  • Shannon Mariotti, assistant professor of political science, presented a paper at the Western Political Science Association conference in Portland, Ore., March 24. The conference panel was titled “Cultivating Democratic Citizens: Pedagogy, Policing, and Practice,” and her paper drew from her current book project and was titled “Adorno on Education: Democratic Leadership as Democratic Pedagogy.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor and chair of Feminist Studies, is spending the week in residence at the University of Arizona. She and Professor Susan Burch of Middlebury College have been invited to lead six workshops with faculty and staff about infusing disability into the work of the university. While there, Kafer will also lead a workshop with LGBTQ students on intersections between disability and queer theory and politics. More information about the workshops is available here.

  • Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, has been appointed to The Humane Society of the United States’ Faith Advisory Council. The 13-member council includes leading scholars and representatives from a range of religious denominations, faiths and backgrounds and was set up to provide strategic guidance for the organization and its leadership. Read more here.

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, presented a paper at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) Association meeting in Lexington, Ky., March 22-25.  Her essay, “Tactile Values: Touching the Renaissance in Late Nineteenth-Century Art Criticism,” has been solicited for publication in the scholarly journal Nineteenth-Century Contexts.

  • Southwestern was highlighted in a recent issue of Teaching Sociology as an institution with the most highly productive scholarship of teaching and learning. The distinction is especially impressive because the other schools highlighted are research universities. Read the paper here.

  • Laura Senio Blair, associate professor of Spanish, has an article titled “Driving Toward Heterotopias: Taxis andTaxistas in Contemporary Chilean Cinema” in the spring 2012 issue of Letras Hispana s, a peer-reviewed, open-access online journal dedicated to publishing scholarly essays that engage topics in connection with Spanish, Latin American and U.S. Latino literatures and cultures. Read the article here.

November 2012

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, delivered a paper at the North American Victorian Studies Association conference in Madison, Wis., Sept. 27-30. The paper, “Mormon Fever: Sensationalizing the Saints in Mrs. Henry Wood’s 1863 Verner’s Pride,” is part of a new research project about female domestic privacy within representations of Mormon polygamy.

  • Jesse Purdy, professor of psychology, is presenting a talk titled “Vertebrate Predators May Share Facial Characteristics Providing Opportunities for Detection by Prey” at the biannual meeting of the International Society of Comparative Psychologists, which is being held this week in Jaen, Spain.

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, recently had an article titled “Native Speaker/Nonnative Speaker Interaction and Orientation to Novice/Expert Identity” published in the Journal of Pragmatics.  

  • Maria Lowe, professor of sociology, and Reggie Byron, assistant professor of sociology, have had an article titled “Food for Thought: Frequent Interracial Dining Experiences as a Predictor of Students’ Racial Climate Perceptions,” accepted for publication in The Journal of Higher Education, the leading scholarly journal on the institution of higher education. Recent graduates Griffin Ferry and Melissa Garcia contributed to the paper.

  • Pianist Kiyoshi Tamagawa and several other members of the music faculty will be the featured performers in a Sept. 9 chamber music concert at the Cailloux Theater in Kerrville. The program will include a rarely performed version of Mozart’s Piano Concerto in D minor arranged for piano, flute, violin and cello by Mozart’s pupil and protégé, Johann Nepomuk Humel; the Quintet in F minor for piano and string quartet by Johannes Brahms; and the regional premiere of a brand new work for piano, violin and cello by Composer in Residence Jason Hoogerhyde. Read more here.   

  • Mary Hale Visser, professor of art and holder of the Herman Brown Chair, presented a paper on “Cybersculpture: materials, processes and the history of sculpture in the digital age” at the European Forum on Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing symposium held in Paris in June.

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, published an article in theSouthwestern Naturalist along with former students Tiffany BiagasAlex Hall and Alexis Ritzer.  The article is titled “Time of day does not affect detection in visual encounter surveys of a spring-dwelling salamander, Eurycea naufragia.” Pierce was recently awarded a third year of funding from the Williamson County Research Foundation for his research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, gave a paper on “The Algerian War through Metropolitan Prisms: How Ideas of Empire Shaped Local Immigration Policies and Policing” at the French Colonial Historical Society’s annual conference in New Orleans May 30-June 2.

  • Music Professor Lois Ferrari and the Austin Civic Orchestra have been named finalists for the 2012 American Prize in two categories: Orchestral Performance (Community Orchestra Division) and Conducting (Community Orchestra Division). Read more here.

  • Fay Guarraci, associate professor of psychology, and Maha Zewail-Foote, associate professor of chemistry, had a paper titled “Kin Discrimination in Prepubescent and Adult Long-Evans Rats” published in the July issue ofBehavioural Processes. Co-authors on the paper include former students Jessica BoltonAlex BurbyBrittany Ford and Carissa Winland.  

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, has published a chapter in a new book titled Seeing Across Cultures in the Early Modern World. His contribution is “Without a Face: Voicing Moctezuma II’s Image at Chapultepec Park, Mexico City.” The book was edited by Dana Leibsohn of Smith College and Jeanette Favrot Peterson of the University of California - Santa Barbara, both well-published scholars of Latin American art history. Read more here.

  • Katy Ross, associate professor of Spanish, presented a paper at the Congreso de la Asociación Hispánica de Humanidades in Madrid June 28-30.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German and chair of the Chinese, French and German Programs, presented her research at the Kentucky Foreign Language Conference in Lexington, Ky., April 19-22, 2012. Her paper titled “Das Wunder von Bern (2003): Cultures of Affect, Spectatorial Responses, Perceptions of History” contributed to a panel of scholars working on German history and film.

  • Two faculty members gave presentations at the Popular Culture/American Culture Association meeting in Boston April 11-12. Elisabeth Piedmont-Marton, associate professor of English, gave a paper titled “Moving Mountains: Karl Marlantes’s Matterhorn and the Canon of Vietnam War Literature” and David Gaines, associate professor of English, gave a presentation titled “A Dylan Fan’s Notes.”

  • Helene Meyers, Professor of English and McManis University Chair, presented “Here and/or Elsewhere: Locating Contemporary Jewish American Literature” at the annual conference of MELUS (the Society for the Study of the Multi-ethnic Literature of the United States). The paper explored the function of Holocaust and Israel narratives in feminist and queer Jewish American novels.  

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history, will present a paper titled “For Whom Did Vitruvius Write?” at a colloquium on Vitruvius being held in Einsiedeln, Switzerland, April 26-29. The paper combines his earlier work on a commentary and illustration of the Roman architect Vitruvius (Vitruvius, Ten Books on Architecture, with Ingrid Rowland, trans, Cambridge University Press, 1999) with his recent work on the architectural context of political activity in Republican Rome.

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, gave an invited talk at the University of Wisconsin-Madison April 17. Her talk, “Practicing Feminist, Queer, Crip,” was part of UW’s lecture series on disability studies and intersectionality. She gave a shorter version of this talk in February at the “Past, Present, and Future of Feminist Studies” conference at UC-Santa Barbara.

  • Steve Kostelnik, assistant professor of music, was one of several classical guitar players who participated in a recent “Views and Brews” program sponsored by KUT-FM at the Cactus Café in Austin. Listen to the show here.

  • The Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción did an interview with Laura Senio-Blair, associate professor of Spanish, who is teaching in Concepción this spring on a Fulbright Fellowship. Read the interview here.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, shared a paper in the seminar, “Shakespeare’s Theories of Translation” at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Boston April 5-7. 

  • Alisa Gaunder, associate professor of political science, presented a paper titled “The Effects of Party Organization on Women in the CDU and the LDP: Chancellors versus ‘Assassins’” at the Southwestern Political Science Association Meeting in San Diego, Calif., April 4-7.

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, has been selected to receive the Southwestern Partner of the Year Award from Georgetown Partners in Education. The award will be presented April 19 at Georgetown High School. Dings was one of several Southwestern faculty, staff and students who started a program in which Spanish III students mentor students at Mitchell Elementary School.

  • David Asbury, assistant professor of music, and Bruce Cain, associate professor of music, performed selections from their “River of Words” song cycle on the Kennedy Center’s Millenium Stage last week. Watch a recording of the performance here.

  • Allison Miller, assistant professor of art history, presented a paper at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies held in Toronto, Canada, March 16. The paper was titled “Monumental Rock-Cut Tombs and Political Self-Fashioning and Han China,” and was included on a panel that she co-organized and chaired titled “Contested Space: New Research on the Tombs of the Chinese Ruling Elite.”

  • Shannon Mariotti, assistant professor of political science, presented a paper at the Western Political Science Association conference in Portland, Ore., March 24. The conference panel was titled “Cultivating Democratic Citizens: Pedagogy, Policing, and Practice,” and her paper drew from her current book project and was titled “Adorno on Education: Democratic Leadership as Democratic Pedagogy.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor and chair of Feminist Studies, is spending the week in residence at the University of Arizona. She and Professor Susan Burch of Middlebury College have been invited to lead six workshops with faculty and staff about infusing disability into the work of the university. While there, Kafer will also lead a workshop with LGBTQ students on intersections between disability and queer theory and politics. More information about the workshops is available here.

  • Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, has been appointed to The Humane Society of the United States’ Faith Advisory Council. The 13-member council includes leading scholars and representatives from a range of religious denominations, faiths and backgrounds and was set up to provide strategic guidance for the organization and its leadership. Read more here.

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, presented a paper at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) Association meeting in Lexington, Ky., March 22-25.  Her essay, “Tactile Values: Touching the Renaissance in Late Nineteenth-Century Art Criticism,” has been solicited for publication in the scholarly journal Nineteenth-Century Contexts.

  • Southwestern was highlighted in a recent issue of Teaching Sociology as an institution with the most highly productive scholarship of teaching and learning. The distinction is especially impressive because the other schools highlighted are research universities. Read the paper here.

  • Laura Senio Blair, associate professor of Spanish, has an article titled “Driving Toward Heterotopias: Taxis andTaxistas in Contemporary Chilean Cinema” in the spring 2012 issue of Letras Hispana s, a peer-reviewed, open-access online journal dedicated to publishing scholarly essays that engage topics in connection with Spanish, Latin American and U.S. Latino literatures and cultures. Read the article here.

October 2012

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, delivered a paper at the North American Victorian Studies Association conference in Madison, Wis., Sept. 27-30. The paper, “Mormon Fever: Sensationalizing the Saints in Mrs. Henry Wood’s 1863 Verner’s Pride,” is part of a new research project about female domestic privacy within representations of Mormon polygamy.

  • Jesse Purdy, professor of psychology, is presenting a talk titled “Vertebrate Predators May Share Facial Characteristics Providing Opportunities for Detection by Prey” at the biannual meeting of the International Society of Comparative Psychologists, which is being held this week in Jaen, Spain.

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, recently had an article titled “Native Speaker/Nonnative Speaker Interaction and Orientation to Novice/Expert Identity” published in the Journal of Pragmatics.  

  • Maria Lowe, professor of sociology, and Reggie Byron, assistant professor of sociology, have had an article titled “Food for Thought: Frequent Interracial Dining Experiences as a Predictor of Students’ Racial Climate Perceptions,” accepted for publication in The Journal of Higher Education, the leading scholarly journal on the institution of higher education. Recent graduates Griffin Ferry and Melissa Garcia contributed to the paper.

  • Pianist Kiyoshi Tamagawa and several other members of the music faculty will be the featured performers in a Sept. 9 chamber music concert at the Cailloux Theater in Kerrville. The program will include a rarely performed version of Mozart’s Piano Concerto in D minor arranged for piano, flute, violin and cello by Mozart’s pupil and protégé, Johann Nepomuk Humel; the Quintet in F minor for piano and string quartet by Johannes Brahms; and the regional premiere of a brand new work for piano, violin and cello by Composer in Residence Jason Hoogerhyde. Read more here.   

  • Mary Hale Visser, professor of art and holder of the Herman Brown Chair, presented a paper on “Cybersculpture: materials, processes and the history of sculpture in the digital age” at the European Forum on Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing symposium held in Paris in June.

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, published an article in theSouthwestern Naturalist along with former students Tiffany BiagasAlex Hall and Alexis Ritzer.  The article is titled “Time of day does not affect detection in visual encounter surveys of a spring-dwelling salamander, Eurycea naufragia.” Pierce was recently awarded a third year of funding from the Williamson County Research Foundation for his research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, gave a paper on “The Algerian War through Metropolitan Prisms: How Ideas of Empire Shaped Local Immigration Policies and Policing” at the French Colonial Historical Society’s annual conference in New Orleans May 30-June 2.

  • Music Professor Lois Ferrari and the Austin Civic Orchestra have been named finalists for the 2012 American Prize in two categories: Orchestral Performance (Community Orchestra Division) and Conducting (Community Orchestra Division). Read more here.

  • Fay Guarraci, associate professor of psychology, and Maha Zewail-Foote, associate professor of chemistry, had a paper titled “Kin Discrimination in Prepubescent and Adult Long-Evans Rats” published in the July issue ofBehavioural Processes. Co-authors on the paper include former students Jessica BoltonAlex BurbyBrittany Ford and Carissa Winland.  

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, has published a chapter in a new book titled Seeing Across Cultures in the Early Modern World. His contribution is “Without a Face: Voicing Moctezuma II’s Image at Chapultepec Park, Mexico City.” The book was edited by Dana Leibsohn of Smith College and Jeanette Favrot Peterson of the University of California - Santa Barbara, both well-published scholars of Latin American art history. Read more here.

  • Katy Ross, associate professor of Spanish, presented a paper at the Congreso de la Asociación Hispánica de Humanidades in Madrid June 28-30.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German and chair of the Chinese, French and German Programs, presented her research at the Kentucky Foreign Language Conference in Lexington, Ky., April 19-22, 2012. Her paper titled “Das Wunder von Bern (2003): Cultures of Affect, Spectatorial Responses, Perceptions of History” contributed to a panel of scholars working on German history and film.

  • Two faculty members gave presentations at the Popular Culture/American Culture Association meeting in Boston April 11-12. Elisabeth Piedmont-Marton, associate professor of English, gave a paper titled “Moving Mountains: Karl Marlantes’s Matterhorn and the Canon of Vietnam War Literature” and David Gaines, associate professor of English, gave a presentation titled “A Dylan Fan’s Notes.”

  • Helene Meyers, Professor of English and McManis University Chair, presented “Here and/or Elsewhere: Locating Contemporary Jewish American Literature” at the annual conference of MELUS (the Society for the Study of the Multi-ethnic Literature of the United States). The paper explored the function of Holocaust and Israel narratives in feminist and queer Jewish American novels.  

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history, will present a paper titled “For Whom Did Vitruvius Write?” at a colloquium on Vitruvius being held in Einsiedeln, Switzerland, April 26-29. The paper combines his earlier work on a commentary and illustration of the Roman architect Vitruvius (Vitruvius, Ten Books on Architecture, with Ingrid Rowland, trans, Cambridge University Press, 1999) with his recent work on the architectural context of political activity in Republican Rome.

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, gave an invited talk at the University of Wisconsin-Madison April 17. Her talk, “Practicing Feminist, Queer, Crip,” was part of UW’s lecture series on disability studies and intersectionality. She gave a shorter version of this talk in February at the “Past, Present, and Future of Feminist Studies” conference at UC-Santa Barbara.

  • Steve Kostelnik, assistant professor of music, was one of several classical guitar players who participated in a recent “Views and Brews” program sponsored by KUT-FM at the Cactus Café in Austin. Listen to the show here.

  • The Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción did an interview with Laura Senio-Blair, associate professor of Spanish, who is teaching in Concepción this spring on a Fulbright Fellowship. Read the interview here.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, shared a paper in the seminar, “Shakespeare’s Theories of Translation” at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Boston April 5-7. 

  • Alisa Gaunder, associate professor of political science, presented a paper titled “The Effects of Party Organization on Women in the CDU and the LDP: Chancellors versus ‘Assassins’” at the Southwestern Political Science Association Meeting in San Diego, Calif., April 4-7.

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, has been selected to receive the Southwestern Partner of the Year Award from Georgetown Partners in Education. The award will be presented April 19 at Georgetown High School. Dings was one of several Southwestern faculty, staff and students who started a program in which Spanish III students mentor students at Mitchell Elementary School.

  • David Asbury, assistant professor of music, and Bruce Cain, associate professor of music, performed selections from their “River of Words” song cycle on the Kennedy Center’s Millenium Stage last week. Watch a recording of the performance here.

  • Allison Miller, assistant professor of art history, presented a paper at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies held in Toronto, Canada, March 16. The paper was titled “Monumental Rock-Cut Tombs and Political Self-Fashioning and Han China,” and was included on a panel that she co-organized and chaired titled “Contested Space: New Research on the Tombs of the Chinese Ruling Elite.”

  • Shannon Mariotti, assistant professor of political science, presented a paper at the Western Political Science Association conference in Portland, Ore., March 24. The conference panel was titled “Cultivating Democratic Citizens: Pedagogy, Policing, and Practice,” and her paper drew from her current book project and was titled “Adorno on Education: Democratic Leadership as Democratic Pedagogy.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor and chair of Feminist Studies, is spending the week in residence at the University of Arizona. She and Professor Susan Burch of Middlebury College have been invited to lead six workshops with faculty and staff about infusing disability into the work of the university. While there, Kafer will also lead a workshop with LGBTQ students on intersections between disability and queer theory and politics. More information about the workshops is available here.

  • Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, has been appointed to The Humane Society of the United States’ Faith Advisory Council. The 13-member council includes leading scholars and representatives from a range of religious denominations, faiths and backgrounds and was set up to provide strategic guidance for the organization and its leadership. Read more here.

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, presented a paper at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) Association meeting in Lexington, Ky., March 22-25.  Her essay, “Tactile Values: Touching the Renaissance in Late Nineteenth-Century Art Criticism,” has been solicited for publication in the scholarly journal Nineteenth-Century Contexts.

  • Southwestern was highlighted in a recent issue of Teaching Sociology as an institution with the most highly productive scholarship of teaching and learning. The distinction is especially impressive because the other schools highlighted are research universities. Read the paper here.

  • Laura Senio Blair, associate professor of Spanish, has an article titled “Driving Toward Heterotopias: Taxis andTaxistas in Contemporary Chilean Cinema” in the spring 2012 issue of Letras Hispana s, a peer-reviewed, open-access online journal dedicated to publishing scholarly essays that engage topics in connection with Spanish, Latin American and U.S. Latino literatures and cultures. Read the article here.

September 2012

  • Jesse Purdy, professor of psychology, is presenting a talk titled “Vertebrate Predators May Share Facial Characteristics Providing Opportunities for Detection by Prey” at the biannual meeting of the International Society of Comparative Psychologists, which is being held this week in Jaen, Spain.

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, recently had an article titled “Native Speaker/Nonnative Speaker Interaction and Orientation to Novice/Expert Identity” published in the Journal of Pragmatics.  

  • Maria Lowe, professor of sociology, and Reggie Byron, assistant professor of sociology, have had an article titled “Food for Thought: Frequent Interracial Dining Experiences as a Predictor of Students’ Racial Climate Perceptions,” accepted for publication in The Journal of Higher Education, the leading scholarly journal on the institution of higher education. Recent graduates Griffin Ferry and Melissa Garcia contributed to the paper.

  • Pianist Kiyoshi Tamagawa and several other members of the music faculty will be the featured performers in a Sept. 9 chamber music concert at the Cailloux Theater in Kerrville. The program will include a rarely performed version of Mozart’s Piano Concerto in D minor arranged for piano, flute, violin and cello by Mozart’s pupil and protégé, Johann Nepomuk Humel; the Quintet in F minor for piano and string quartet by Johannes Brahms; and the regional premiere of a brand new work for piano, violin and cello by Composer in Residence Jason Hoogerhyde. Read more here.   

  • Mary Hale Visser, professor of art and holder of the Herman Brown Chair, presented a paper on “Cybersculpture: materials, processes and the history of sculpture in the digital age” at the European Forum on Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing symposium held in Paris in June.

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, published an article in theSouthwestern Naturalist along with former students Tiffany BiagasAlex Hall and Alexis Ritzer.  The article is titled “Time of day does not affect detection in visual encounter surveys of a spring-dwelling salamander, Eurycea naufragia.” Pierce was recently awarded a third year of funding from the Williamson County Research Foundation for his research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, gave a paper on “The Algerian War through Metropolitan Prisms: How Ideas of Empire Shaped Local Immigration Policies and Policing” at the French Colonial Historical Society’s annual conference in New Orleans May 30-June 2.

  • Music Professor Lois Ferrari and the Austin Civic Orchestra have been named finalists for the 2012 American Prize in two categories: Orchestral Performance (Community Orchestra Division) and Conducting (Community Orchestra Division). Read more here.

  • Fay Guarraci, associate professor of psychology, and Maha Zewail-Foote, associate professor of chemistry, had a paper titled “Kin Discrimination in Prepubescent and Adult Long-Evans Rats” published in the July issue ofBehavioural Processes. Co-authors on the paper include former students Jessica BoltonAlex BurbyBrittany Ford and Carissa Winland.  

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, has published a chapter in a new book titled Seeing Across Cultures in the Early Modern World. His contribution is “Without a Face: Voicing Moctezuma II’s Image at Chapultepec Park, Mexico City.” The book was edited by Dana Leibsohn of Smith College and Jeanette Favrot Peterson of the University of California - Santa Barbara, both well-published scholars of Latin American art history. Read more here.

  • Katy Ross, associate professor of Spanish, presented a paper at the Congreso de la Asociación Hispánica de Humanidades in Madrid June 28-30.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German and chair of the Chinese, French and German Programs, presented her research at the Kentucky Foreign Language Conference in Lexington, Ky., April 19-22, 2012. Her paper titled “Das Wunder von Bern (2003): Cultures of Affect, Spectatorial Responses, Perceptions of History” contributed to a panel of scholars working on German history and film.

  • Two faculty members gave presentations at the Popular Culture/American Culture Association meeting in Boston April 11-12. Elisabeth Piedmont-Marton, associate professor of English, gave a paper titled “Moving Mountains: Karl Marlantes’s Matterhorn and the Canon of Vietnam War Literature” and David Gaines, associate professor of English, gave a presentation titled “A Dylan Fan’s Notes.”

  • Helene Meyers, Professor of English and McManis University Chair, presented “Here and/or Elsewhere: Locating Contemporary Jewish American Literature” at the annual conference of MELUS (the Society for the Study of the Multi-ethnic Literature of the United States). The paper explored the function of Holocaust and Israel narratives in feminist and queer Jewish American novels.  

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history, will present a paper titled “For Whom Did Vitruvius Write?” at a colloquium on Vitruvius being held in Einsiedeln, Switzerland, April 26-29. The paper combines his earlier work on a commentary and illustration of the Roman architect Vitruvius (Vitruvius, Ten Books on Architecture, with Ingrid Rowland, trans, Cambridge University Press, 1999) with his recent work on the architectural context of political activity in Republican Rome.

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, gave an invited talk at the University of Wisconsin-Madison April 17. Her talk, “Practicing Feminist, Queer, Crip,” was part of UW’s lecture series on disability studies and intersectionality. She gave a shorter version of this talk in February at the “Past, Present, and Future of Feminist Studies” conference at UC-Santa Barbara.

  • Steve Kostelnik, assistant professor of music, was one of several classical guitar players who participated in a recent “Views and Brews” program sponsored by KUT-FM at the Cactus Café in Austin. Listen to the show here.

  • The Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción did an interview with Laura Senio-Blair, associate professor of Spanish, who is teaching in Concepción this spring on a Fulbright Fellowship. Read the interview here.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, shared a paper in the seminar, “Shakespeare’s Theories of Translation” at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Boston April 5-7. 

  • Alisa Gaunder, associate professor of political science, presented a paper titled “The Effects of Party Organization on Women in the CDU and the LDP: Chancellors versus ‘Assassins’” at the Southwestern Political Science Association Meeting in San Diego, Calif., April 4-7.

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, has been selected to receive the Southwestern Partner of the Year Award from Georgetown Partners in Education. The award will be presented April 19 at Georgetown High School. Dings was one of several Southwestern faculty, staff and students who started a program in which Spanish III students mentor students at Mitchell Elementary School.

  • David Asbury, assistant professor of music, and Bruce Cain, associate professor of music, performed selections from their “River of Words” song cycle on the Kennedy Center’s Millenium Stage last week. Watch a recording of the performance here.

  • Allison Miller, assistant professor of art history, presented a paper at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies held in Toronto, Canada, March 16. The paper was titled “Monumental Rock-Cut Tombs and Political Self-Fashioning and Han China,” and was included on a panel that she co-organized and chaired titled “Contested Space: New Research on the Tombs of the Chinese Ruling Elite.”

  • Shannon Mariotti, assistant professor of political science, presented a paper at the Western Political Science Association conference in Portland, Ore., March 24. The conference panel was titled “Cultivating Democratic Citizens: Pedagogy, Policing, and Practice,” and her paper drew from her current book project and was titled “Adorno on Education: Democratic Leadership as Democratic Pedagogy.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor and chair of Feminist Studies, is spending the week in residence at the University of Arizona. She and Professor Susan Burch of Middlebury College have been invited to lead six workshops with faculty and staff about infusing disability into the work of the university. While there, Kafer will also lead a workshop with LGBTQ students on intersections between disability and queer theory and politics. More information about the workshops is available here.

  • Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, has been appointed to The Humane Society of the United States’ Faith Advisory Council. The 13-member council includes leading scholars and representatives from a range of religious denominations, faiths and backgrounds and was set up to provide strategic guidance for the organization and its leadership. Read more here.

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, presented a paper at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) Association meeting in Lexington, Ky., March 22-25.  Her essay, “Tactile Values: Touching the Renaissance in Late Nineteenth-Century Art Criticism,” has been solicited for publication in the scholarly journal Nineteenth-Century Contexts.

  • Southwestern was highlighted in a recent issue of Teaching Sociology as an institution with the most highly productive scholarship of teaching and learning. The distinction is especially impressive because the other schools highlighted are research universities. Read the paper here.

  • Laura Senio Blair, associate professor of Spanish, has an article titled “Driving Toward Heterotopias: Taxis andTaxistas in Contemporary Chilean Cinema” in the spring 2012 issue of Letras Hispana s, a peer-reviewed, open-access online journal dedicated to publishing scholarly essays that engage topics in connection with Spanish, Latin American and U.S. Latino literatures and cultures. Read the article here.

  • Shannon Mariotti, assistant professor of political science, has been invited to contribute the article on Ralph Waldo Emerson for The Encyclopedia of Political Thought. Her article will be published in the forthcoming series from Wiley-Blackwell in 2012.  

August 2012

  • Mary Hale Visser, professor of art and holder of the Herman Brown Chair, presented a paper on “Cybersculpture: materials, processes and the history of sculpture in the digital age” at the European Forum on Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing symposium held in Paris in June.

  • Ben Pierce, professor of biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair, published an article in theSouthwestern Naturalist along with former students Tiffany BiagasAlex Hall and Alexis Ritzer.  The article is titled “Time of day does not affect detection in visual encounter surveys of a spring-dwelling salamander, Eurycea naufragia.” Pierce was recently awarded a third year of funding from the Williamson County Research Foundation for his research on the Georgetown salamander.

  • Melissa Byrnes, assistant professor of history, gave a paper on “The Algerian War through Metropolitan Prisms: How Ideas of Empire Shaped Local Immigration Policies and Policing” at the French Colonial Historical Society’s annual conference in New Orleans May 30-June 2.

  • Music Professor Lois Ferrari and the Austin Civic Orchestra have been named finalists for the 2012 American Prize in two categories: Orchestral Performance (Community Orchestra Division) and Conducting (Community Orchestra Division). Read more here.

  • Fay Guarraci, associate professor of psychology, and Maha Zewail-Foote, associate professor of chemistry, had a paper titled “Kin Discrimination in Prepubescent and Adult Long-Evans Rats” published in the July issue ofBehavioural Processes. Co-authors on the paper include former students Jessica BoltonAlex BurbyBrittany Ford and Carissa Winland.  

  • Patrick Hajovsky, assistant professor of art history, has published a chapter in a new book titled Seeing Across Cultures in the Early Modern World. His contribution is “Without a Face: Voicing Moctezuma II’s Image at Chapultepec Park, Mexico City.” The book was edited by Dana Leibsohn of Smith College and Jeanette Favrot Peterson of the University of California - Santa Barbara, both well-published scholars of Latin American art history. Read more here.

  • Katy Ross, associate professor of Spanish, presented a paper at the Congreso de la Asociación Hispánica de Humanidades in Madrid June 28-30.

  • Erika Berroth, associate professor of German and chair of the Chinese, French and German Programs, presented her research at the Kentucky Foreign Language Conference in Lexington, Ky., April 19-22, 2012. Her paper titled “Das Wunder von Bern (2003): Cultures of Affect, Spectatorial Responses, Perceptions of History” contributed to a panel of scholars working on German history and film.

  • Two faculty members gave presentations at the Popular Culture/American Culture Association meeting in Boston April 11-12. Elisabeth Piedmont-Marton, associate professor of English, gave a paper titled “Moving Mountains: Karl Marlantes’s Matterhorn and the Canon of Vietnam War Literature” and David Gaines, associate professor of English, gave a presentation titled “A Dylan Fan’s Notes.”

  • Helene Meyers, Professor of English and McManis University Chair, presented “Here and/or Elsewhere: Locating Contemporary Jewish American Literature” at the annual conference of MELUS (the Society for the Study of the Multi-ethnic Literature of the United States). The paper explored the function of Holocaust and Israel narratives in feminist and queer Jewish American novels.  

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history, will present a paper titled “For Whom Did Vitruvius Write?” at a colloquium on Vitruvius being held in Einsiedeln, Switzerland, April 26-29. The paper combines his earlier work on a commentary and illustration of the Roman architect Vitruvius (Vitruvius, Ten Books on Architecture, with Ingrid Rowland, trans, Cambridge University Press, 1999) with his recent work on the architectural context of political activity in Republican Rome.

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor of feminist studies, gave an invited talk at the University of Wisconsin-Madison April 17. Her talk, “Practicing Feminist, Queer, Crip,” was part of UW’s lecture series on disability studies and intersectionality. She gave a shorter version of this talk in February at the “Past, Present, and Future of Feminist Studies” conference at UC-Santa Barbara.

  • Steve Kostelnik, assistant professor of music, was one of several classical guitar players who participated in a recent “Views and Brews” program sponsored by KUT-FM at the Cactus Café in Austin. Listen to the show here.

  • The Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción did an interview with Laura Senio-Blair, associate professor of Spanish, who is teaching in Concepción this spring on a Fulbright Fellowship. Read the interview here.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, shared a paper in the seminar, “Shakespeare’s Theories of Translation” at the Shakespeare Association of America conference in Boston April 5-7. 

  • Alisa Gaunder, associate professor of political science, presented a paper titled “The Effects of Party Organization on Women in the CDU and the LDP: Chancellors versus ‘Assassins’” at the Southwestern Political Science Association Meeting in San Diego, Calif., April 4-7.

  • Abby Dings, assistant professor of Spanish, has been selected to receive the Southwestern Partner of the Year Award from Georgetown Partners in Education. The award will be presented April 19 at Georgetown High School. Dings was one of several Southwestern faculty, staff and students who started a program in which Spanish III students mentor students at Mitchell Elementary School.

  • David Asbury, assistant professor of music, and Bruce Cain, associate professor of music, performed selections from their “River of Words” song cycle on the Kennedy Center’s Millenium Stage last week. Watch a recording of the performance here.

  • Allison Miller, assistant professor of art history, presented a paper at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies held in Toronto, Canada, March 16. The paper was titled “Monumental Rock-Cut Tombs and Political Self-Fashioning and Han China,” and was included on a panel that she co-organized and chaired titled “Contested Space: New Research on the Tombs of the Chinese Ruling Elite.”

  • Shannon Mariotti, assistant professor of political science, presented a paper at the Western Political Science Association conference in Portland, Ore., March 24. The conference panel was titled “Cultivating Democratic Citizens: Pedagogy, Policing, and Practice,” and her paper drew from her current book project and was titled “Adorno on Education: Democratic Leadership as Democratic Pedagogy.”

  • Alison Kafer, associate professor and chair of Feminist Studies, is spending the week in residence at the University of Arizona. She and Professor Susan Burch of Middlebury College have been invited to lead six workshops with faculty and staff about infusing disability into the work of the university. While there, Kafer will also lead a workshop with LGBTQ students on intersections between disability and queer theory and politics. More information about the workshops is available here.

  • Laura Hobgood-Oster, professor of religion and environmental studies, has been appointed to The Humane Society of the United States’ Faith Advisory Council. The 13-member council includes leading scholars and representatives from a range of religious denominations, faiths and backgrounds and was set up to provide strategic guidance for the organization and its leadership. Read more here.

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, presented a paper at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) Association meeting in Lexington, Ky., March 22-25.  Her essay, “Tactile Values: Touching the Renaissance in Late Nineteenth-Century Art Criticism,” has been solicited for publication in the scholarly journal Nineteenth-Century Contexts.

  • Southwestern was highlighted in a recent issue of Teaching Sociology as an institution with the most highly productive scholarship of teaching and learning. The distinction is especially impressive because the other schools highlighted are research universities. Read the paper here.

  • Laura Senio Blair, associate professor of Spanish, has an article titled “Driving Toward Heterotopias: Taxis andTaxistas in Contemporary Chilean Cinema” in the spring 2012 issue of Letras Hispana s, a peer-reviewed, open-access online journal dedicated to publishing scholarly essays that engage topics in connection with Spanish, Latin American and U.S. Latino literatures and cultures. Read the article here.

  • Shannon Mariotti, assistant professor of political science, has been invited to contribute the article on Ralph Waldo Emerson for The Encyclopedia of Political Thought. Her article will be published in the forthcoming series from Wiley-Blackwell in 2012.  

  • Thomas Howe, professor of art and art history, has been invited to contribute a chapter to a new reference book on Greek architecture titled A Companion to Greek Architecture that will be published later this year by Wiley-Blackwell publishers. The title of his chapter is “Hellenistic Architecture in Italy: Consuetudo Italica.” The book is being edited by Margaret M. Miles of U.C. Irvine.

  • Shana Bernstein, associate professor of history, gave two invited talks at UT San Antonio Feb. 29. The first was an undergraduate lecture on her book, Bridges of Reform: Interracial Civil Rights Activism in Twentieth-Century Los Angeles, and the second was a graduate and faculty seminar presentation on her current project, “The ‘Garbage Ladies’ of the Settlements: Environmental Justice Reform in Progressive-Era Chicago.”

  • Bob Bednar, associate professor and chair of communication studies, presented a paper titled “Remembering Road Trauma: The Lives of Roadside Crash Shrines in the American Southwest” at the Southwest/Texas Popular Culture Association Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Feb. 9.

  • Kathryn Stallard, head of Special Collections in the A. Frank Smith Library Center, had an article on the library’s crowdsourced transcription of an 1846 U.S- Mexico War Diary (see story here) published in the Feb. 12 issue of The Southwestern Archivist

More Faculty Notables

"Faculty Notables" are published each week, during the academic year, by the Office of Communications. You can read them in the weekly publication, In Focus.