Sarofim School of Fine Arts

Paying it Forward: Edouard Manet and Contemporary Art

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    Edouard Manet, Portrait of Victorine Meurent, c. 1862
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    Rineke Dykstra, ‘Tia, Amsterdam, Netherlands, November 14’, 1994.

Guest lecture by Susan Sidlauskas from Rutgers University.

Southwestern University Art History program is pleased to present a lecture on modern art on Thursday April 11, 2013 at 4pm. Susan Sidlauskas, Professor of Art History at Rutgers University, will speak on “Paying it Forward: Edouard Manet and Contemporary Art”. The talk will be held in Olin 110 with a public reception to follow in the Olin lobby.


Abstract:


The impact of Edouard Manet’s paintings–particularly his representations of women continues to be seen in the work of a significant number of contemporary artists–both painters and photographers.  What is it about Manet’s art that seems to exert a particular force today?  Why does this difficult, idiosyncratic, painter compel such intense, protracted attention at a moment characterized by an unprecedented saturation of images? This talk will consider a group of Manet’s portraits of women, and explore their resonance with the work of contemporary artists such as Rineke Dykstra, Michaël Borremans, and Cindy Sherman.

Bio:


Susan Sidlauskas is Professor and Graduate Program Director in the Department of Art History at Rutgers University. Sidlauskas is one of the foremost figures in the area of nineteenth-century art history. She is the author of Cézanne’s Significant Other: The Portraits of Hortense (University of California Press, 2009), and Body, Place, and Self in Nineteenth-Century Painting (Cambridge University Press, 2000), as well as numerous articles and book chapters on nineteenth-century art. Her work on the body, concepts of self, and gender in the art of Cézanne, Degas, Sargent and others has shaped the field in significant ways, and she continues to make major contributions to our understanding of how art, sexuality and cultural ideology intersect in European nineteenth-century visual culture.

 

This lecture is sponsored by the Sarofim School of Fine Arts Visiting Artist and Scholar Series. Additional support provided by the Global Citizens Fund, Feminist Studies Program, and International Studies Program. For further information, contact Kim Smith: smithk@southwestern.edu.