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Ten Faculty-Student Research Projects Receive Funding for 2011-2012

  • News Image
    Maria Cuevas, one of ten faculty-student research project funding recipients

Projects will enable more than 20 students to conduct research with faculty members

Southwestern has funded 10 faculty-student research projects for the 2011-2012 academic year. The projects will enable more than 20 Southwestern students to conduct research with faculty members, particularly during the summer.

  • Steve Alexander, associate professor of physics, received $15,661 to evaluate the efficiency of a thermal battery.  
  • Reggie Byron, assistant professor of sociology, received $2,180 for a study of home invasion robberies in six U.S. cities.
  • The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry received $53,942 that will enable six of its faculty members to work with student researchers over the summer. Seven students will be funded through this grant.
  • Maria Cuevas, associate professor of biology, received $3,600 to continue her research on tight junction proteins in breast epithelial and endometrial cancer cells.
  • Martin Gonzalez, professor of biology, received $18,408 to assess how mutations occur in the bacterium E. coli.
  • Rebecca Lorins, assistant professor of religion, received $14,041 for a project that will study the learning of Islam and the learning of Islamophobia in Texas.

  • Sandi Nenga, assistant professor of sociology, received $3,269 to continue her assessment of Southwestern’s Vicente Villa Summer Scholars Program.

  • Rick Roemer, professor of theatre, received $7,804 for a project that will introduce the American musical theatre tradition to Bulgarians through the production of a performance at the Rhodopi International Theater Laboratory in Smolyan, Bulgaria, this summer.

  • Eric Selbin, professor of political science, received $3,577 for a research project about women who participated in the 1909 Shirtwaist Strike in New York City.  

  • Wildlife biologist Jinelle Sperry received $4,359 for a study on the effects of deer overabundance on avian abundance, diversity and reproductive success in Central Texas.