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In Focus: 9/17/2010

A weekly newsletter published by the Communications Office

Top News

SOUTHWESTERN RECEIVES $443,000 FEDERAL GRANT TO OFFER  SUMMER PROGRAMS FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS, TEACHERS


Southwestern has received a $443,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Education that will enable it to offer three different summer programs for high school students and teachers in the coming years.

The grant will fund a three-year summer program in math and science for traditionally underserved high school students, a three-year summer program of computer science workshops for high school teachers, and one year of an existing college preparation summer program for first generation, predominantly Latina/o high school students.

Read more here.

FIFTEEN YEARS LATER, 1995 VOLLEYBALL TEAM WILL GET ITS CHAMPIONSHIP RINGS

When Southwestern switched to Division III competition in 1993, some people thought the school would not be able to field winning athletic teams because it could no longer offer scholarships to athletes.

The 1995 women’s volleyball team proved them wrong.

In just their second year of Division III play, the team won the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC) championship by beating Trinity University in one of the first tournaments played in Southwestern’s then-new Robertson Center.

Other than a few newspaper clippings, team members never got anything to show for their accomplishment.

That all will change Sept. 18. Thanks to a donor who wishes to remain anonymous, members of the team will finally get the rings they earned.

Read more here

Events

WRITERS VOICE TICKETS AVAILABLE STARTING NEXT WEEK

Mira Nair, an Indian-born filmmaker who has brought several major literary works to film, will be the 2010 visiting author in the Writer’s Voice Series sponsored by the A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library Center. Nair will give a public lecture at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 9, in the Alma Thomas Theater.

The lecture is free, but tickets are required. Tickets will be available to the campus community beginning Sept. 20 and to the general public on Oct. 4. Tickets may be reserved here.

Read more about Nair and the 2010 Writer’s Voice lecture here.

‘MUD’ TO BE PERFORMED IN THE BLACK BOX THEATER SEPT. 23-26


“Mud,” a play written in 17 short scenes by Maria Irene Fornes, will be performed in Southwestern’s Black Box Theater Sept. 23-26. Performances will start at 7 p.m. Thursday and 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. There also will be 3 p.m. matinees Saturday and Sunday.

Set in the 1930’s Mud explores the joyless existence of Mae, a small-town woman, and two men who love, need and ultimately destroy her. The play includes adult subject matter and is for mature audiences only.  

Tickets for the play are $5 and may be purchased by calling the box office at 512-863-1378 Monday through Friday between 1-5 p.m. or by going online to www.southwestern.edu/boxoffice.

The Black Box Theater, also known as Heather Hall, is located above the Jones Theater in the Fine Arts Building. The play is directed by Becca Plunkett.

SEPT. 26 FACULTY RECITAL WILL FEATURE WORKS FOR CELLO, PIANO

Cellist Hai Zheng and pianist Kiyoshi Tamagawa will give a faculty recital on Sunday, Sept. 26, at 7 p.m. in the Alma Thomas Theater. The concert will feature the Prelude in F Major, Op. 2 No.1, and Danse Orientale in A Minor ,Op. 2 No. 2, by Sergei Rachmaninoff; “Japanese Suite” and “Fantasia” by Sang Tong; and the Sonata in F major, Op. 6, by Richard Strauss.

The performance is free and open to the public. For more information, call The Sarofim School of Fine Arts at 512-863-1504.

Media Coverage

The Williamson County Sun ran a story about the research former History Professor Erik Loomis did on the 1921 flood in Williamson County.

Notables

Shannon Mariotti, assistant professor of political science, presented a paper on Emerson and experiences of political conversion at the American Political Science Association convention in Washington, D.C., Sept. 1-5.  She also chaired a panel titled “The Problem of ‘The People’ in American Political Thought.”

A new book by Thomas McClendon, professor of history, has been published by the University of Rochester Press in its series Rochester Studies in African History and the Diaspora. The book is titled White Chief, Black Lords: Shepstone and the Colonial State in Natal, South Africa, 1845-1878.