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In Focus: 4/9/2010

A weekly newsletter published by the Communications Office

Top News

SOUTHWESTERN STUDENTS TO SHARE RESEARCH AND CREATIVITY AT APRIL 14 SYMPOSIUM

More than 100 students from Southwestern University will showcase their talents on Wednesday, April 14, as the university hosts its 11th annual Student Works Symposium titled “From Every Voice.”

The event begins at 5 p.m. in the Red and Charline McCombs Campus Center. The symposium is an opportunity for students to present research and creative work in a professional atmosphere. The students will show the skills they have acquired in and out of the classroom.

“The Student Works Symposium is a great realm for students to showcase what they have done here at Southwestern,” said Chrissy Vasquez, a junior religion major and program chair for this year’s symposium.

The symposium will include 99 presentations featuring the work of 116 students from 24 disciplines. Students will show their work through a combination of poster presentations, oral presentations, exhibitions and discussions. 

Read the rest of the story here.

FOUR SOUTHWESTERN GRADUATES RECEIVE NSF FELLOWSHIPS TO SUPPORT THEIR GRADUATE STUDIES  

Four students who graduated from Southwestern in 2009 have received grants from the National Science Foundation to support their studies in graduate school.  

he NSF’s Graduate Research Fellowship Program is for students who are college seniors, first-year graduate students, or second-year graduate students. The fellowships are funded for up to three years and provide students with a yearly stipend of $30,000. The NSF typically funds fewer than 10 percent of the applications it receives for these fellowships.  

“Given that this competition awards only the best and brightest of the applications in all areas of the sciences, we should be very pleased with this outcome,” said Jesse Purdy, a professor of psychology who has helped select recipients of these fellowships in the past.

Read the rest of the story here.

Events

NEW SENIOR ART EXHIBITS ON DISPLAY APRIL 8-17

An exhibition featuring the work of three senior art students will be on display in the Fine Arts Gallery April 8-17.

The exhibition will feature mixed media by Matt Kramer, textiles by Abbie Garcia and paintings by Paloma Mayorga.

An opening reception will be held on Thursday, April 8, from 4-6 p.m. The gallery will be open daily April 8-17 from 1-5 p.m.

APRIL 10 LATINO HERITAGE SYMPOSIUM WILL EXPLORE THE ISSUE OF IMMIGRATION

The fifth annual Latino Heritage Symposium will be held on Saturday, April 10, from 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. in the McCombs Ballrooms.

The symposium is titled “Immigration: Realities of a Controversial Struggle” and will feature lectures and workshops on this complicated topic. The symposium will also include a 3 p.m. screening of “The 800 Mile Wall” directed by Juan Carlos Frey, which depicts the problems related to the recent border wall construction. A discussion will follow.

The symposium is free and open to the public. For more information, write LHSymposium@gmail.com or call Mary González at 512-863-1342.

SU CHORALE, ORCHESTRA TO PERFORM BACH ‘MAGNIFICAT’ APRIL 11

The Southwestern University Chorale and Orchestra will present Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Magnificat” on Sunday, April 11, at 7 p.m. in Lois Perkins Chapel.

Soloists for the concert include Chorale members Catherine Klassen, Katie De La Vega, David Shaw, Ashley Foster, Zach Zeman, Brooke Lyssy and Brian Miller. Southwestern faculty members playing in the orchestra include Eri Lee Lam, Adrienne Inglis, Stephen Martin, Susan Douglas and Pam Rossman. The Chorale and Orchestra will be conducted by Kenny Sheppard.

The concert also will include Bach’s Cantata 140, “Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme.”
It is free and open to the public.

APRIL 12 FLEMING LECTURE WILL LOOK AT IMPACT OF BORDER FENCE ON BIODIVERSITY

Joseph A. Cook, professor of biology and curator of mammals at the Museum of Southwestern Biology at the University of New Mexico, will give a lecture at Southwestern on Monday, April 12. The lecture is titled “Implications of Fragmentation for Biodiversity” and will begin at noon in Olin 110.  

The lecture will relate what is known about fragmentation or limitation of habitat on small populations of animals, and the possible effects of the U.S.-Mexico border fence on populations of mammals in the Southwestern United States. 

The presentation is part of the 2010 Fleming Science Lecture Series. It is free and open to the public.

APRIL 14 SALON AT WILDFIRE WILL FEATURE PROFESSOR EMERITUS ELLSWORTH PETERSON

Ellsworth Peterson, professor emeritus at Southwestern University and artistic director of the Georgetown Festival of the Arts, will be the featured speaker at the April 14 “Salon at Wildfire” sponsored by the Williamson Museum. Peterson will speak about Aaron Copeland and the upcoming Festival of the Arts beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the backroom of Wildfire Restaurant, 812 S. Austin Ave. in Georgetown.

Peterson holds an undergraduate degree from Southwestern, a master’s degree in sacred music from Union Theological Seminary in New York, and a Ph.D. from Harvard. He has served as artistic director of the last five Georgetown Festival of the Arts events and as organizer for five Brown Symposia at Southwestern.  Earlier this year, Peterson was awarded Southwestern’s Martha Diaz Hurtado College Town Award for his efforts in enhancing the “college town” environment for students, faculty and staff at Southwestern. Peterson is a native of Georgetown, where his grandparents were part of the city’s early Swedish community.

The Salon at Wildfire is a monthly program hosted by The Williamson Museum that features presentations by leading professionals and researchers in their respective fields.  Presentations are followed by opportunities to visit with the speakers and others in attendance. For more information, visit www.williamsonmuseum.org.

SU ORCHESTRA TO PERFORM APRIL 17

The Southwestern University Orchestra will perform in concert under the direction of Lois Ferrari on Saturday, April 17, at 7 p.m. in the Alma Thomas Theater.

The program for the concert includes Dvorak’s 8th Symphony in G; the Albinoni Adagio, conducted and arranged by senior Magen Comley; and Holst’s Brook Green Suite, conducted by members of Ferrari’s Advanced Conducting class.

The concert is free and open to the public.

Media Coverage

Communication Studies Professor David Olson was quoted in a story the Christian Science Monitor did about the state of political discourse in America. Read the Monitor story here.

The Williamson County Sun covered the Brooks Prize Debate, the SU Native Powwow and the SU Arts Festival.

Notables

Seniors Reese Cisneros and Todd Boone received the 2010 Pirate Anchor Award this week. The award is presented annually to a male and female athlete who best display a number of traits that embody the spirit and character of the Southwestern community. Cisneros is a member of the volleyball team and Boone is a member of the baseball team. Read more about them here.

Other finalists for the 2010 Pirate Anchor Award were Alex Keller (soccer), Daniel Rudd (cross country/track), Jessica Herbst (basketball) and Tami Warner (cross country/track).

Eileen Cleere, associate professor of English, is a featured speaker at the 18th and 19th-Century British Women Writers Conference at Texas A& M University April 8-10. Her paper, “Aesthetic Anachronism: Mary Ward’s 1913 The Mating of Lydia and the Persistent Plot of Sanitary Fiction,” is part of the last chapter of her book manuscript, The Sanitary Arts: Aesthetic Culture and the Victorian Cleanliness Campaigns.

Florence Gould, professor emeritus of political science, was invited to comment on two papers that were presented at the Texas State Historical Association meeting March 3-5 in El Paso. Both papers discussed the remarkable career of Oveta Culp Hobby (1905-1995), who served as parliamentarian of the Texas Legislature in the 1920s and married former Texas Governor Will Hobby. She became editor of the Houston Post newspaper, organizer of the Women’s Army Corp during WWII and the first Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare in the 1950s. 

NITLE has published a case study featuring Melanie Hoag, instructional technologist, and Patricia Schiaffini, assistant professor of Chinese. The case study details how Schiaffini teamed up with Hoag and Southwestern’s Information Technology Services to bring a renowned expert on modern Tibetan politics and media studies to her classroom for a live question-and-answer session. Read the case study here.

A book by Helene Meyers, professor of English and holder of the McManis University Chair, has just been published by Greenwood Press. Reading Michael Chabon is designed for general readers and is the first book devoted to the Pulitzer-Prize winning author who bridges the gap between literary and popular culture. For more information, visit       http://www.abc-clio.com/products/overview.aspx?productid=111545&viewid=1

Michael Mosser, visiting professor of political science, had an article published in the current issue of Joint Force Quarterly. The article is titled “The Dangers of Mistaking Coherence for Capability” and argues that there is no such thing as a global insurgency. Read the article here.

Suzy Pukys, director of civic engagement, has been asked to serve on the Texas Council on Family Violence’s Public Policy Committee for the coming legislative session. The committee will give input on the council’s lobbying priorities and lobby state representatives in support of those priorities. The appointment resulted from her involvement with Southwestern’s grant from the Verizon Foundation which addresses family violence.

Portions of a concert conducted by Kenny Sheppard, professor of music, are included in a new DVD titled “Mendelssohn, The Nazis and Me.” The DVD, which was originally made for a BBC broadcast, includes the chorus and orchestra Sheppard directed for the 2009 Festival of the Arts in Georgetown performing a chorus from Mendelssohn’s “St. Paul” oratorio.