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Michael Saenger

Associate Professor of English

saengerm

Areas of expertise
Shakespeare, Renaissance Literature, Shakespeare through Performance

Michael Saenger, Associate Professor of English, teaches and writes on Shakespeare from a wide variety of perspectives.  He is the author of two books, The Commodification of Textual Engagements in the English Renaissance (Ashgate, 2006), and Shakespeare and the French Borders of English (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), and editor of Interlinguicity, Internationality and Shakespeare (McGill-Queen's UP, 2014), as well as numerous articles on Renaissance and other literature.  He has been a Finalist for the Southwestern Teaching Award, and he teaches courses on such subjects as Medieval literature, Shakespeare in film and Shakespeare through Performance.  He is interested in exploring how Shakespeare crossed linguistic barriers, and how modern students must cross similar barriers, both to read Shakespeare and to participate in the modern world.  This interest, emerging from the culture of Texas in general and of Southwestern students in particular, has encouraged him to find intersections between fields as various as book history,  literary theory, language acquisition, comparative theology and poetic nationalism. 


Education

M.A., Ph.D.,Univerisity of Toronto 2000
A.B.,University of California, Berkeley 1991

Publications

Books:

Shakespare and the French Borders of English. Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

The Commodification of Textual Engagements in the English Renaissance. Ashgate, 2006. Reviewed in Renaissance QuarterlyReview of English Studies, Sixteenth Century Journal, Times Literary Supplement.

Interlinguicity, Internationality and Shakespeare.  Edited with an introduction by Michael Saenger. McGill-Queen's University Press, 2014.

 

 

Articles:

Co-authored with Sergio Costola, "Shakespeare's Venice and the Grammar of the Modern City." Forthcoming in Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance: Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition. Edited by Michele Marrapodi.  Ashgate, 2014.

“Interlinguicity and The Alchemist.” Multilingualism in the Drama of Shakespeare and his Contemporaries. Ed. Dirk Delabastita and Ton Hoenselaars. English Text Construction 6 (2013): 176-200.

“The Limits of Translation in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Shakespeare Survey 65 (2012): 69-76.

"Apocryphal Agency: A Yorkshire Tragedy and Early Modern Authorship." Shakespeare Yearbook (2005).

"The Birth of Advertising," in Printing and Parenting in Early Modern England. ed. Douglas Brooks. Ashgate, 2005.

"Pericles and the Burlesque of Romance." Pericles: Critical Essays. Ed. David Skeele. New York: Garland, 2000.  Book reprinted by Routledge, 2009.  Saenger essay reprinted in Shakespeare Criticism 90.

"Ah ain't heard whut de tex wuz: The (Il)legitimate Textuality of Old English and Black English." Oral Tradition 14 (1999).

"Did Sidney Revise Astrophil and Stella?" Studies in Philology 96 (1999).

"The Costumes of Caliban and Ariel qua Sea-Nymph." Notes and Queries 240 (1995).

Review article on Hackett Publishing's editions of Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene. Comitatus. 38 (2007)

"Nashe's Pamphletarie Periwigge." Notes and Queries 246 (2001).

"Dekker's Shoemaker's Holiday." Explicator 57 (1999).

"Nashe, Moth and the Date of Love's Labour's Lost." Notes and Queries 243 (1998).

"A Reference to Ovid in Coriolanus." English Language Notes 34 (1997).

"Will Stephen Wrest Bombast from Falstaff?" James Joyce Quarterly 35 (1997).

"Shakespeare's Macbeth." Explicator 53 (1995).

"Manningham on Malvolio." Shakespeare Newsletter 43 (1993).


Seminars & Presentations

Keynote Lecture at the University of London's conference "Adapting, Performing and Reviewing Shakespeare in a European Context."

Interviewed on Belarus television regarding Hamlet, directed by Igor Kazakov in Mogilev

 

 

 

 


Honors & Awards

2010 Visiting Fellow, Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies

2008 Finalist for Southwestern University Teaching Award

2002-2009 Cullen Faculty Development Awards

2000 A.S.P. Woodhouse Prize (outstanding dissertation in English, University of Toronto)

1998-1999 University of Toronto Department of English Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award


Specific subjects or issues you can knowledgeably discuss:
Shakespeare, literature, Renaissance, history of reading

I am willing to talk to the media: yes

I am willing to talk to community groups about my area of expertise: yes

Can you do interviews in Spanish? yes

Other languages you are fluent in:

Experience with the news media (especially electronic media):

Contact Details:
(512) 863-1787(office)
Office: Mood-Bridwell 206
saengerm@southwestern.edu