Southwestern

Engaging Minds, Transforming Lives

Sociology & Anthropology

Notables

Spring 2013

  • Five senior anthropology majors presented their capstone research at the Southwestern Anthropological Association’s Annual Conference in San Jose, Calif., April 18-20. Kristi Lenderman won second place in the Student Paper Competition for her paper “Chilean Intercultural Education and Contentious Identities: Constructions of Sexuality and Gender in the Mapuche Community.” Alejandra Benitez presented a paper titled “On the Border of Texas and Peru: Domination and Subjugation of Non-Privileged Identities,” Fehima Dawy presented a paper titled “Fitting into the Ideals of a ‘New India’ after Breast Cancer: Survivor Stories from Mumbai, India,” MLe McWilliams presented a paper titled “Mermaids, Mythology & Marble: A Search for Identity in a Multitude of Conflicting Selves,” and Chloe Morris presented a paper titled “Nexus of Healing: The Experiences of Female Bedu Healers in Jordan.” All five wrote the papers under the direction of Melissa Johnson, associate professor of anthropology.

  • Eight students and three faculty members are participating in the annual meeting of the Southern Sociological Society in Atlanta this week. Isaac Bernal is presenting a paper titled “Performing Spanish: Gatekeeping in a First-Generation Latino Peer Culture” that was done under the direction of Sandi Nenga, associate professor of sociology. Lucero Castillo and Joanna Hawkins are presenting a paper  titled “Patterns and Change in the Portrayal of the Elderly in Print Advertising” that was done as part of an independent study with Edward L. Kain, professor of sociology and University Scholar. Four students are presenting papers based upon their research in a capstone course taught by Maria Lowe, professor of sociology: Lorenza Cigarroa will present a paper titled “Leading Occupy Austin: Constructing an Alternate Conception of Leadership Through Direct Democracy and Collective Action.” Anna Fetchick will present a paper titled “Don’t Bring it Home: How Emotion Work and Individual Identity Affect Activist Participation.” Megan Robinson will present a paper titled “’I’m Feeding the World Tonight’: The Impact of Moral Identity Standards on Mobile Loaves & Fishes Homeless Outreach Ministry.” Caroline Wright will present a paper titled “Friendship, Brotherhood, Sisterhood, and Family: Collective Identity, Social Ties, and Free Space as Motivation for Volunteers at the Ride On Center for Kids.” At the same meeting, Kain is leading a professional workshop on “Preparing for a Program Review.” Lowe and Alice H. Nguyen will present their research on “‘They May Be Up to No Good’: The Heightened Surveillance of Men of Color On a Predominantly White Neighborhood Listserv.” And Nenga will present a paper titled “Constructing the ‘Typical College Student’: How College Prep Workshops Encourage and Discourage First-Generation College-Bound Latino High School Students.” 

  • Sandi Nenga, associate professor of sociology, and Jessica Taft (Davidson College), just published a co-edited volume titled Youth Engagement: The Civic-Political Lives of Children and Youth. The volume brings together studies of children and youth’s activism and volunteer work. It is volume 16 in the series Sociological Studies of Children and Youth (Bingley, UK:  Emerald). 

  • The December 2012 issue of ASA Footnotes, the newsletter of the American Sociological Association, included an article titled “Changes in the MCAT Have Implications for Sociology Department Planning” that was written by Edward L. Kain, professor of sociology and University Scholar. Kain had significant help on the article from Kerry Bruns, professor of chemistry.

Fall 2012

  • Sandi Nenga, associate professor of sociology, published an article titled “Not the community, but a community: Transforming youth into citizens through volunteer work” in the December 2012 issue of the Journal of Youth Studies, an international journal headquartered in Glasgow, UK.

  • Melissa Johnson, professor of anthropology, presented a paper titled “Hunters, Ecotourists and Hicatee: Creolizing Socionatures in Belize” for a panel she co-organized with Timo Kaartinen of the University of Helsinki on “Social Assemblages and the Pursuit of Nature in the Global Resource Economy” at the American Anthropological Association’s 2012 Annual Meeting, which was held Nov. 14-18 in San Francisco.

  • Brenda Sendejo, assistant professor of anthropology, organized a panel and presented a paper at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting in San Francisco Nov. 14-18. The title of the panel was “Decolonizing Borderland Ethnographies: Indigenous and Feminist Methodologies of Resistance” and her  paper was titled “Our Lady of Guadalupe-Tonantzin: An Active Symbol of Tejana Self-Making.”

  • Maria Lowe, professor of sociology, and Reggie Byron, assistant professor of sociology, have had an article titled “Food for Thought: Frequent Interracial Dining Experiences as a Predictor of Students’ Racial Climate Perceptions,” accepted for publication in The Journal of Higher Education, the leading scholarly journal on the institution of higher education. Recent graduates Griffin Ferry and Melissa Garcia contributed to the paper.

  • Sandi Nenga, associate professor of sociology, presented a paper co-authored with Kathryn Gold Hadley of Hanover College titled “To De-Emphasize or Highlight Ethnicity? How Two Positive Youth Development Programs Empower Southeast Asian Youth” at the American Sociological Association meetings in Denver in August. She also was the organizer, presider and discussant for a panel on “Children and Youth.”

  • Sandi Nenga, associate professor of sociology, presented a paper co-authored with Kathryn Gold Hadley of Hanover College titled “To De-Emphasize or Highlight Ethnicity? How Two Positive Youth Development Programs Empower Southeast Asian Youth” at the American Sociological Association meetings in Denver in August. She also was the organizer, presider and discussant for a panel on “Children and Youth.”

  • Melissa Johnson, professor of anthropology, chaired a panel on Community, Environment and Governance at the Caribbean Studies Association’s 37th Annual Conference, which was held in Guadeloupe May 28-June 1.