Southwestern

Engaging Minds, Transforming Lives

English

Notables

Spring 2014

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, gave an invited lecture titled “Reel and Novel Jews: A Feminist and Queer Renaissance” at Vassar April 3. Read more here.

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, chaired two panels and delivered a paper at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Conference in Houston March 27-30. Her talk, “Resuscitating Ruskin: Race Culture as Aesthetic Culture at the fin de siècle,” was drawn from the final chapter of her forthcoming book, The Sanitary Arts: Aesthetic Culture and the Victorian Cleanliness Campaigns. Cleere also served on the Program Committee for the conference.

  • Senior English major Katie McLaughlin received Southwestern’s second annual Rose Prize for Literary Criticism, which comes with a $200 check. McLaughlin won the prize for her capstone paper, which was titled “‘Everybody Writes’: Re-imagining Reader, Writer, and Text in the Online Community.” Read more here.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, has been invited to deliver the first keynote address at an international Shakespeare conference hosted by the Institute of Modern Languages Research at the University of London. The conference, titled “Adapting, Performing & Reviewing Shakespearean Comedy in a European Context,” will draw attendees from across Europe and beyond. His talk will concern the role of language and genre in mediating Shakespeare in the modern world.

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, assisted in the translation of program notes from Russian to English to accompany Igor Kazakov’s ongoing production of “Hamlet” at the Mogilev Regional Puppet Theater in Belarus. The production has been a popular success, and won praise from critics

  • Sergio Costola, associate professor of theatre, and Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, co-authored an essay titled “Shylock’s Venice and the Grammar of the Modern City,” that was accepted in a forthcoming collection of essays, Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance: Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition, edited by Michele Marrapodi, to be published by Ashgate in late 2014 or early 2015. Their essay suggests that Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice shows how Jews and other foreigners − such as John Florio, a contemporary of Shakespeare − were alienated in London, as well as in Venice.    

Spring 2013

  • Michael Saenger, associate professor of English, wrote a review of The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture, vol. 1, Cheap Print in Britain and Ireland to 1660 that appeared in the most recent issue of Notes and Queries, a publication of Oxford University Press.

  • David Gaines, associate professor of English, presented “Bob Dylan, Mitch Miller, Brave Combo, and ‘Must Be Santa’” at the Experience Music Project Pop Conference in Seattle, Wash., April 20. The conference proceedings were simulcast to conference venues in New York, Los Angeles, Cleveland and New Orleans.

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, delivered a paper called “Chaste Polygamy and Victorian Sensation Fiction” at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) conference in Charlottesville, Va. , March 14-17.  The essay extends her current project on representations of Mormon marriage in Victorian literature, 1860-1870. While at INCS she also chaired a panel on British Romantic literature, and agreed to serve on the selection committee for the 2014 INCS conference hosted by the University of Houston.

  • Elisabeth Piedmont-Marton, associate professor of English, presented a paper titled “The Limits of Liberal Literacy Pedagogies in a Global Context: Lessons from Vietnam” on a panel called Questioning English Instruction Abroad and at Home at the 2013 Conference on College Composition and Communication held March 13-16 in Las Vegas. At the conference she saw Southwestern graduate Sarah Hart, who completed her Ph.D. in August and is teaching as an adjunct at Colorado State and working on a book project based on her dissertation on rhetoric and poetry.

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, had an article titled “Tactile Consciousness: Art, Cognitive Criticism, and the (New) Degeneration Debates” published in the current issue of Nineteenth-Century Contexts.

  • Eileen Cleere, professor of English, delivered a paper at the North American Victorian Studies Association conference in Madison, Wis., Sept. 27-30. The paper, “Mormon Fever: Sensationalizing the Saints in Mrs. Henry Wood’s 1863 Verner’s Pride,” is part of a new research project about female domestic privacy within representations of Mormon polygamy.

Fall 2012

  • Identity Papers: Contemporary Narratives of American Jewishness has recently been released in paperback. This book, by Helene Meyers, Professor of English and McManis University Chair, has also been “highly recommended” by Choice. For more information, see
    http://www.sunypress.edu/p-5279-identity-papers.aspx

  • Eileen Cleere, Professor of English, was a featured speaker at Rice University on October 7, 2012. Her lecture, “Visual Culture and Aesthetic Experience” was part of “Papers in Honor of Robert Lowry Patten,” an academic celebration of the scholarship and intellectual legacy of the Rice professor. Patten, an international authority on Victorian culture, especially the works of Charles Dickens, was one of Cleere’s dissertation directors.

  • English majors and Debby Ellis Writing Center consultants Andrea Gannon and Devin Corbitt, along with Dr. Elisabeth Piedmont-Marton, presented a panel on The Undergraduate as Administrator at the International Writing Centers Association conference in San Diego on October 25.

  • Michael Saenger’s article, “The Limits of Translation in A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” was published in Shakespeare Survey, an annual publication of Cambridge University Press.  The article explores the meanings of translation, in various senses, in the Bible and Shakespeare’s play.

  • Helene Meyers, Professor of English and McManis University Chair, has a review of Lesléa Newman’s October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard in Lilith Magazine: the Blog.  Read it here: http://www.lilith.org/blog/2012/09/memory-and-teshuva-a-review-of-october-mourning/

  • Helene Meyers, Professor of English and McManis University Chair, reviewed Michael Chabon’s Telegraph Avenue for Charleston’s Post and Courier.  The review appeared on Sunday 28 October. You can read it here: 
    http://www.postandcourier.com/article/20121028/PC1201/121029375/1003/-telegraph-avenue-is-chabon-s-latest

  • Identity Papers: Contemporary Narratives of American Jewishness by Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, has recently been released in paperback and also has been “highly recommended” by Choice

  • Michael Saenger’s review of “Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual, Volume 25” was published in the latest edition of Sixteenth Century Journal. Saenger is an associate professor of English.

  • Helene Meyers, professor of English and McManis University Chair, presented a paper titled “The Unmarked Chains of Paper Clips” at the Ninth Tel Aviv International Colloquium on Cinema and Television Studies in June. The paper, which traces the forms of white Southern Christian forgetting that often accompany Holocaust memorialization, is part of Meyers’ new book project on Jewish American cinema. 

  • 2012 graduate and English major Hayley Hervieux recently published an opinion piece in The Austin-American Statesman entitled “A 21-Year-Old Ponders Retirement.” Hayley is an intern at AARP. You can find the article with the following link: http://www.statesman.com/opinion/hervieux-a-21-year-old-ponders-retirement-2430344.html?cxtype=rss_ece_frontpage

  • Helene Meyers, Professor of English and McManis University Chair, presented “The Unmarked Chains of Paper Clips” at the Ninth Tel Aviv International Colloquium on Cinema and Television Studies in June.  This paper, which traces the forms of white Southern Christian forgetting that often accompany Holocaust memorialization, is part of Meyers’ new book project on Jewish American cinema.