Southwestern

Engaging Minds, Transforming Lives

Classics

Greek 2009

Greek Literature from the 4th cent. BCE


Syllabus for Advanced Greek 294/394: 4th Century Prose
Fall, 2010


Index

General Information

 

Description

 
 

Course Components

 
 

Objectives

 
 

Course Requirements

 
 

Preparation

 

Lectures

 

Response Papers

 

Tutorials

 

Examinations

 

Evaluation

 

Readings

 

Schedule of Assignments

 
 

Week 1 (9/13-17)

   
 

Week 2 (9/20-24)

   
 

Week 3 (9/27-10/1)

   
 

Week 4 (10/4-8)

   
 

Week 5 (10/11-15)

   
 

Week 6 (10/18-222)

   
 

Week 7 (10/25-29)

   
 

Week 8 (11/1-11/5)

   
 

Week 9 (11/8-12)

   
 

Week 10 (11/15-19)

   
 

Week 11 (11/22-26)

   
 

Week 12 (11/29-12/3)

   
 

Week 13 (12/6-10)

   

 Description

This course, making extensive use of resources available via the Internet, focuses on the forensic oratory in Athens as represented by the work of Lysias (ca. 445-ca. 380) and Demosthenes (384-322). The common sessions and secondary readings will explore how these readings reflect the legal, social, and political world of Athens in the late 5th and 4th centuries BCE. 

Course Components

Lectures: Beginning September 13, students and faculty members will "meet" for common sessions, each one guided by a professor teaching the course or by an invited guest. These common sessions will combine elements of a lecture and discussion about the assigned readings  for the week. They may feature other materials to provide context and introduce ideas for future exploration. While each common session will have its own topic, each will refer back to material already covered and will anticipate topics and readings yet to come.

Response Papers: Students will submit and critique response papers that will address study questions for each week of the course. This aspect of the course will take place during the week (Thursday and Friday) when students will submit their work and comment on the views of their peers. This will take place in the course worksite on the CHS Sakai server.

Tutorial: Finally, students will meet by arrangement with the participating faculty members on their campuses for one or more tutorials each week.

 Objectives

The objectives for this course are for students (1) to gain familiarity with the grammar and vocabulary of Greek prose from the early 4th century, through reading forensic orations by Lysias and Demosthenes and (2) to develop an understanding of the Athenian legal system of the late 5th and 4th centuries BCE and its social and political context. 

Course Requirements

 Preparation:

All students will be expected to work through the assigned reading for each week, attend the common sessions, submit responses to the forum, and meeting with their faculty mentors in tutorial. This course is intended for advanced, mature students, who can effectively and conscientiously work through the materials and fulfill the assignments with minimal supervision. The participating faculty members presuppose that students will come to each event prepared to participate actively. Students should take advantage of every resource to ensure that they thoroughly understand the readings and have a command of the interpretive issues that will form the basis of the lectures, response papers, and tutorials. This course can accommodate advanced students at varying levels of experience and fluency. In general, students with five or more semesters of ancient Greek should enroll in Greek 394, and those with less than five, in Greek 294. Depending on the needs of students at individual campuses, the amount of assigned reading may vary from that posted on this syllabus. The tutor at each institution will work with students to determine appropriate assignments.

The questions and topics for the response papers are designed so that students in both levels of the course can complete them. 

 Common Sessions

The common sessions will take place in a virtual space hosted by Elluminate. Shortly before the session begins, students will log into the room by pointing their browsers at the following URL:

https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?password=M.EED952BD32B75F1D891EF1D30E924E&sid=voffice

This will take users to the "Elluminate Session Log-in" where they will need to provide a name for the session and click on the "Login" button. This will initiate a download. The downloaded file, meeting.jnlp, will then launch the web-based Elluminate application. (Please note that users need to download a new file each time. If they do not delete the first meeting.jnlp file, the subsequent file will be meeting-1.jnlp and so on. Because this involves downloading a file from the Internet, which launches an application, users will need to have sufficient privileges on their workstation.) We encourage participants to take advantage of the support provided by Elluminate for version 10, which includes recorded training sessions and user guides.  The Elluminate system consists of audio and video conferencing modules, a whiteboard, and a chat room. The sessions will be recorded, so participants can access the sessions for further study and review. Consequently, they will be responsible for the material the course covers during the common sessions and should expect to encounter questions on the examinations based the content of the common sessions and the presenter's responses to questions from the participants.

 Response Papers

Students will be expected to share their views of the readings and common session with their peers and faculty mentors through a worksite hosted by the CHS Sakai server: Greek 394 Fall 2010. A set of topics will accompany each reading assignment. Students will post responses to these questions in the Forum section of Greek 394 worksite by no later than 5:00 p.m. each Thursday as noted on the schedule below. Some of the questions aim to evoke a sustained, synthetic engagement with the readings; others will deal with topics of specific significance for a particular reading assignment or common session. At the conclusion of the course, the weekly contributions of each student to the discussion list should represent a significant body of interpretative work. Consequently, the response to each question should be considerably more than a sentence or two, and each set of responses should represent a focused, reflective engagement with the readings after the respondents have thoroughly read and studied the texts. After the responses to the study questions appear in the Forum, students will receive an assignment to review and comment on the responses of at least one other student. Students must post their comments by Sunday afternoon at 5:00 pm (local time). The grade for this element of the course will consist of two components. The first, which accounts for fifteen percent of the students' final grades, will depend on the students' adequate and timely responding to the study questions and providing thoughtful commentary on the responses of at least one of their peers. Students will receive full credit for posting their response papers and their commentaries on the remarks of other students by the scheduled deadlines. The director of the course may single out particularly excellent papers and comments and award bonus credit. The second component, twenty-five percent of the final grade, will reflect the quality of the contributions. (Please note that the on-campus tutors, or "mentors" as they will be designated in the following materials, may require additional work on this component of the course to reflect the time spent in the course before or after the period of collaborative activities. This work may take various forms such as an introduction, epilogue, critical review, or expansion on one or more of the topics.) These two components will account for forty percent of the students' final grades.

 Tutorials:

Students will meet every week with a mentor at her or his home institution. Participants on each campus should consult with their tutors to determine the times and locations of these meetings. It is the students' responibility to contact their faculty mentors and finalize the details of their weekly meetings. The quality of these meetings, as measured by students' preparation, attendance, and engagement with the readings, will account for twenty percent of their final grades.

 Examinations:

There will be two examinations, a midterm and final over the content, cultural context, and interpretation of the literature. These will be based on the readings, response papers, and lectures. Individual campuses may choose to conduct additional examinations that pertain more specifically to the language of the orations. Here are some additional points to bear in mind with regard to this aspect of the course:

  1. Design of the examinations

The mentors from each campus will collaborate on the design of these examinations to ensure that they reflect the common experience of the students in the course. During this design process, the mentors also establish the evaluative guidelines they will follow when grading the examinations.

  1. The grading process

The tutors will grade the midterm examination collaboratively. When students submit their responses to the questions on the midterm, the course director will remove any biographical information from the exams and distribute the responses to the mentors who will evaluate the students' work without knowledge of the students' identity. This anonymous procedure ensures that students from different institutions will receive an impartial evaluation of their work. When the mentors return the exams to the director, she or he will match the exam with the biographical data and return the graded work to the students and their faculty mentors. As is true of all courses at the collegiate level, only the student and her or his faculty mentor will receive the grades. The faculty mentors will grade the final examinations of the students at their home institutions. Participants should refer any questions about the grading to the director of the course.

 Evaluation:

Grades will be based on the following components:

Class preparation and work in tutorial:

20%

Response papers:

40%

Midterm:

20%

Final:

20%

 Primary Readings

In Greek:

Lysias

1. On the Death of Eratosthenes

   

3. Against Simon

   

32. Against Diogeiton

 

Demosthenes

54. Against Conon

In translation:

Demosthenes

27. Against Aphobos 1

 

Thucydides

6.1-29

 

Andocides

1. On the Mysteries

 

Plato

Apology

Secondary Readings

Boegehold (1991)

"Three Court Days," Symposion 1990: Papers on Greek and Hellenistic Legal History, edited by Michael Gagarin (Köln: Böhlau Verlag).

Cohen (1995.61-86)
Cohen (1995.119-142)

Chapter 4, "Rhetoric, litigation, and the values of an agonistic society," and chapter 6, "Violence and litigation," in Law, Violence and Community in Classical Athens (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), pp. 61-86, 119-142.

Gagarin (2003)

"Telling Stories in Athenian Law," Transactions of the American Philological Association 133: 197-207.

Herman (1993)

"Tribal and Civic Codes of Behavior in Lysias 1," Classical Quarterly 43: 406-419

Morgan (1982)

"Euphiletos' House: Lysias 1," Transactions of the American Philological Association 112: 115-123

Porter (1997)

"Adultery by the Book: Lysias 1 (On the Murder of Eratosthenes) and Comic Diegesis," Echos du Monde Classique 40: 421-453.

Schedule of Assignments

 Week 1 (9/13-17)

 

Reading (394):

Readings in Greek: Lysias 1.1-14 (759 words) (to be read before Monday, September 13)
Readings in English: Herman (1993)

 

Reading (294):

Readings in Greek: Lysias 1.1-10 (486 words) (to be read before Monday, September 13)
Readings in English: Herman (1993)

By Arrangement:

Tutorial

Make arrangements to meet with your on-campus tutor to work through the readings.

Monday:

Common Session (1)

"Law and Order in Ancient Athens: An Introduction to the Course," Kenny Morrell (Rhodes College)

Tuesday-Friday:

Response Papers

You will find instructions for the first assignment by following the link to "Week 1" in the Forum section of the worksite. This assignment will call for you to take a survey, post a response to a question, and then comment on the response of another participant in the course. Your post will be due by 5:00 pm on Thursday, September 16. You comments will be due by 5:00 pm on Saturday, September 18.

 Week 2 (9/20-24)

 

Reading (394):

Readings in Greek: Lysias 1.15-28 (921 words)
Readings in English: Morgan (1982)

 

Reading (294):

Readings in Greek: Lysias 1.11-18 (447 words)
Readings in English: Morgan (1982)

By Arrangement:

Tutorial

 

Monday:

Common Session (2)

"Law and Oratory in Classical Athens," Michael Gagarin (University of Texas, Austin)

Tuesday-Friday:

Response Papers

You will find instructions for the response papers by following the link to "Week 2" in the Forum section of the worksite. For this assignment you will study and discuss the meaning of words that appear in Lysias 1 and then post a response to one of two questions. Your word study and response will be due at 5:00 pm on Friday, September 24

 Week 3 (9/27-10/1)

 

Reading (394):

Readings in Greek: Lysias 1.29-50 (1325 words)

 

Reading (294):

Readings in Greek: Lysias 1.19-28 (507 words)

By Arrangemen:

Tutorial

 

Monday:

Common Session (3)

"Gender and Sexuality in Athenian Society," Walter Stevenson (University of Richmond)

Tuesday-Sunday:

Response Papers

Instructions for this week are available by following the link to "Week 3" in the Forum section of the worksite. Your responses will take the form of two narratives, one you give your logographos, and one you write as a logographos. Both narratives will be due by 5:00 pm on Sunday, October 3.

 Week 4 (10/4-8)

 

Reading (394):

Readings in Greek: Lysias 3.1-24 (1081 words)
Readings in English: Porter (1997), Gagarin (2003)

 

Reading (294):

Readings in Greek: Lysias 1.29-36 (435 words)
Readings in English: Porter (1997), Gagarin (2003)

By Arrangement:

Tutorial

 "The Physical Setting of the Athenian Courts," Hal Haskell (Southwestern University)

Monday:

Common Session (4)

 

Tuesday-Friday:

Response Papers

Please follow the link to "Week 4" in the Forum section of the worksite for information about the response papers for this week. They will be due by 5:00 pm on Friday, October 8.

 Week 5 (10/11-15) [Southwestern is on Fall break 10/11-12)

 

Reading (394):

Readings in Greek: Lysias 3.25-48 (1153 words)
Readings in English: chapter 4, "Rhetoric, litigation, and the values of an agonistic society," in Cohen (1995.61-86)

 

Reading (294):

Readings in Greek: Lysias 1.37-50 (581 words)
Readings in English: chapter 4, "Rhetoric, litigation, and the values of an agonistic society," in Cohen (1995.61-86)

By Arrangement:

Tutorial

 

Monday:

Common Session (5)

"The Rhetoric of Forensic Oratory," Sarah Ferrario (Catholic University)

Tuesday-Friday:

Response Papers

Midterm (Details, including the date and time when the exam is due, will be available on Friday, October 8.)

 Week 6 (10/18-22) [Rhodes is on fall break (10/18-19)]

 

Reading (394):

Readings in Greek: Demosthenes 54.1-12 (1053 words)
Readings in English: "Introduction" and "409-340" in Boegehold (1991)

 

Reading (294):

Readings in Greek: Demosthenes 54.1-7 (611 words).
Readings in English: "Introduction" and "409-340" in Boegehold (1991)

By Arrangement:

Tutorial

 

Monday:

Common Session (6)

"Inter-familial Conflict," Walter Stevenson (University of Richmond)

Tuesday-Sunday:

Response Papers

Instructions for the response papers are available by following the link to "Week 6" in the Forum section of the worksite. They will call for contributions to a catalogue of topoi, which are due by 5:00 pm on Sunday, October 24.

 Week 7 (10/25-29)

 

Reading (394):

Readings in Greek: Demosthenes 54.13-29 (1176 words)
Readings in English: chapter 6, "Violence and litigation," in Cohen (1995.119-142)

 

Reading (294):

Readings in Greek: Demosthenes 54.8-15  (663 words)
Readings in English: Cohen (1995.119-142)

By Arrangement:

Tutorial

 

Monday:

Common Session (7)

"Violence in Athenian Society," Hal Haskell (Southwestern University)

Tuesday-Sunday:

Response Papers

You will find instructions by following the link to "Week 7" in the Forum section of the worksite. For this assignment you will study the system for resolving conflict in another ancient society. Your observations will be due by 5:00 pm on Sunday, October 31.

 Week 8 (11/1-11/5)

 

Reading (394):

Readings in Greek: Demosthenes 54.30-44 (1110 words)
Readings in English:

 

Reading (294):

Readings in Greek: Demosthenes 54.16-25 (664 words).
Readings in English:

By Arrangement:

Tutorial

 

Monday:

Common Session (8)

"Money and Politics in Ancient Athens," Kenny Morrell (Rhodes College)

Tuesday-Friday:

Response Papers

For the topics of the response papers for this week click on "Week 8" in the Forum section of the worksite. You will post responses to two of three questions by 5:00 pm on Friday, November 5.

 Week 9 (11/8-12)

 

Reading (394):

Readings in Greek: Lysias 32.1-18 (1092 words)
Reading in English: Thucydides 6.1-29, Andocides 1

 

Reading (294):

Readings in Greek: Demosthenes 54.26-36 (749 words)
Reading in English: Thucydides 6.1-29, Andocides 1

By Arrangement:

Tutorial

 

Monday:

Common Session (9)

"Politics in Law," Sarah Ferrarios (Catholic University)

Tuesday-Saturday:

Response Papers

This week you will examine the nature of the legal system in contemporary America as reflected in court television. Further details are available by following the link to "Week 9" in the Forum section of the worksite. Your analyses will be due by 5:00 pm on Saturday, November 13.

 Week 10 (11/15-19) [Last week of classes at Knox]

 

Reading (394):

Readings in Greek: Lysias 32.19-29 (739 words)
Readings in English: Plato, Apology

 

Reading (294):

Readings in Greek: Demosthenes 54.37-44 (648 words)
Readings in English: Plato, Apology

By Arrangement:

Tutorial

 

Monday:

Common Session (10)

"Plato's Apology," Ryan Fowler (Knox College)

Tuesday-Saturday:

Response Papers

This week you will revise the narratives you created earlier this semester and add a prooimion based on addition information concerning the two cases. You will find further information by following the link to "Week 10" in the Forum section of the worksite. Your new narrative and accompanying prooimion will be due by 5:00 pm on Saturday, November 20.

 Week 11 (11/22-26) [Thanksgiving Week: Knox has examinations on 11/21-23.]

Week 12 (11/29-12/3) [Last week of classes for Southwestern.]

Week 13 (12/6-10) [Last day of classes (12/8) at Rhodes. Final examinations at Southwestern.]

     

 

Classics

  • Contact

    Halford Haskell, PhD
    Professor & Chair
    512-863-1554
    email