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Classics

Classics

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The Classics major offers a diverse and rigorous interdisciplinary program. Students are exposed to the entire range of disciplines in classical studies: literature, history, mythology, religion, philosophy, and art & archaeology. The major provides a distinctive liberal arts foundation for students pursuing any career.

Majors are strongly advised to take advantage of Southwestern’s opportunities to study abroad. Students may pursue summer or academic year study at College Year in Athens, the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies, or various other programs.

Incoming students who place into the language sequence may be eligible for credit.

A student majoring in Classics must meet the following requirements:

12 courses minimum (At least 24 credits in the major must be upper level) (Majors consist of a minimum of 30 credits.)

  1. Four courses of earned college-level Latin and four courses of earned college-level Greek, including two upper-level courses in Latin or Greek
  2. One course in Classics in Translation
  3. Two additional upper-level courses in Latin and/or Greek, or in Classics in Translation
  4. Classics 07-954 (Capstone)

Click here for a Classics Major checklist.

A student majoring in Classics (through 2009/2010 catalog) must meet the following requirements:

  1. Four courses of earned college level Latin and four courses of earned college level Greek, including six semester hours of upper level work in either Latin or Greek
  2. Six semester hours of Classics in Translation (see list below)
  3. Six additional upper level hours in either (1) Latin and/or Greek or (2) Classics in Translation
  4. Capstone (07-953)
  5. At least 24 semester hours must be upper level.
 Courses that may be counted toward requirements 2 and 3 include:
  • 07-114 WORLD ARCHITECTURE: A COMPARATIVE CULTURAL HISTORY
    See Art History 71-114. (Biennially) (FAL) (IP) (WA)
  • 07-204 GREEK AND ROMAN MYTHOLOGY
    A study of the myths and religion of Greece and Rome, with particular attention to their formation in the eastern world and with a focus on the recrystallization of Classical myth in later literature and art. Exploration of the theories of the study of myth. Extensive readings of primary documents in translation. Also English 10-204 and Religion 19-504. (H) (R) (IP) (WA)
  • 07-314 GREEK CIVILIZATION
    The political, social, and cultural history of Greece. The rise, development, and diffusion of the civilization of Greece with particular attention to its Graeco-Asiatic and Graeco-African environment. Includes a section on Greece's contribution to later cultures. Extensive readings of primary documents in translation. May be repeated with change of content. Also History 16-314. (Biennially) (H) (IP) (WA)
  • 07-324 ROMAN CIVILIZATION
    An examination of the development of Roman Civilization, from its beginnings until its dissolution, set within the broad cultural continuum of the Mediterranean world. Includes a section on Rome's contribution to later cultures. Extensive readings of primary documents in translation. May be repeated with change of content. Also History 16-324. (Biennially) (H) (IP) (WA)
  • 07-334 HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY: ANCIENT
    See Philosophy 18-614. (H)
  • 07-354 HELLENISTIC ART
    See Art History 71-444. (FAL) (WA)
  • 07-404 PERFORMING SANCTITY: HOLY LIVING AND HOLY WRITING IN LATE ANTIQUITY AND THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD
    A study of saints’ lives from the late ancient world and the Latin Middle Ages, revealing the religious life of the periods that produced them as well as information about basic social and cultural history. Involves close reading and discussion of primary texts in translation from the original Latin. (H)
  • 07-414 MEDIEVAL BEAST FABLES
    A study of the use of the animal kingdom to satirize human courtly society in the Middle Ages, with attention to some of the social and personal needs fulfilled by telling or listening to these fables. Involves close reading and discussion of primary texts in translation from the original Latin. (H)
  • 07-424 FABULOUS EXEMPLUM: MEDIEVAL LEGENDS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT
    A study of Alexander’s complicated legacy, as both a rhetorical example of what (not) to do, and as the protagonist of a series of fantastic adventures that please and instruct. Involves close reading and discussion of primary texts in translation from the original Latin. (H)
  • 07-434 MEDIEVAL LEGENDS OF TROY
    A study of the use of classical narratives to legitimize political power and literary production in the Middle Ages, with attention to the multiple significances of translation. Involves close reading and discussion of primary texts in translation from the original Latin. (H)
  • 07-001 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in content.
  • 07-002 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in content.
  • 07-003 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in content.
  • 07-004 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in content.
  • 07-301 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in content.
  • 07-302 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in content.
  • 07-303 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in content.
  • 07-304 SELECTED TOPICS
    May be repeated with change in content.
  • 07-901 TUTORIAL
  • 07-902 TUTORIAL
  • 07-903 TUTORIAL
  • 07-904 TUTORIAL
  • 07-941 ACADEMIC INTERNSHIP
    Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 07-942 ACADEMIC INTERNSHIP
    Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 07-943 ACADEMIC INTERNSHIP
    Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 07-944 ACADEMIC INTERNSHIP
    Must be taken Pass/D/F.
  • 07-951 INDEPENDENT STUDY
    May be repeated with change in content.
  • 07-952 INDEPENDENT STUDY
    May be repeated with change in content.
  • 07-953 INDEPENDENT STUDY
    May be repeated with change in content.
  • 07-954 INDEPENDENT STUDY
    May be repeated with change in content.
  • 07-964 SEMINAR
    An interdisciplinary study of various aspects of Greek and Roman antiquity. May be repeated with change of content.
  • 07-984 HONORS
    By invitation only.

The Capstone consists of a semester-long research project which encompasses a wide range within the area of Classical studies. The project culminates with a formal paper and an oral presentation to an interdepartmental committee chosen by the student and the faculty project advisor.

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Click for a list of Classics courses offered in the current academic year.