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Dr. Diane Ackerman

writer and poet, received her M.A., M.F.A. and Ph.D. from Cornell University. Her works of nonfiction include The Zookeeper's Wife, An Alchemy of Mind, Deep Play, The Rarest of the Rare, A Natural History of the Senses and The Moon by Whale Light. Her poetry has been published in leading literary journals and in books. Dr. Ackerman received a Guggenheim Fellowship, the John Burroughs Nature Award and the Lavan Poetry Prize. In addition, she was honored as a Literary Lion by the New York Public Library. She also has the rare distinction of having a molecule named after her--dianeackerone. Her essays about nature and human nature have appeared in The New York Times, Parade, The New Yorker, National Geographic, and she hosted a five-hour PBS television series inspired by A Natural History of the Senses. Dr. Ackerman will speak generally to the self-worlds of non-human animals providing glimpses into the worlds of animals that are quite different from us.


Dr. Christopher W. Clark

is the Imogene Powers Johnson Director of the Bioacoustics Research Program at the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology and Senior Scientist in the Department of Neurobiology & Behavior. He holds advanced degrees in electrical engineering (M.S.E.E., SUNY-Stony Brook, 1974) and biology (Ph.D., SUNY-Stony Brook, 1980). His doctoral research concentrated on acoustic communication in southern right whales. In 1980, Dr. Clark became an NIH postdoctoral fellow and was later appointed assistant professor at The Rockefeller University where he conducted research on vocal learning in songbirds. He joined the Cornell faculty and the Laboratory of Ornithology in 1987. Dr. Clark's research concentrates on animal acoustic communication with a particular focus on the development and application of advanced acoustic methods for scientific conservation of endangered species. He leads the Bioacoustics Research Program in the design, development and application of computer-based systems for quantitative analysis of animal vocalizations, and acoustic techniques to detect, recognize, classify, locate, track and census free-ranging animals. Dr. Clark will provide insight into the self-worlds of the great whales focusing on right and humpback whales.


Dr. David Fogel

is president and chief executive officer of Natural Selection, Inc. He was a Systems Analyst for Titan Systems, Inc. (1984-1988), and a Senior Principal Engineer at ORINCON Corporation (1988-1993). He received a Ph.D. in engineering sciences from the University of California at San Diego in 1992. Dr. Fogel has more than 200 publications in technical literature, the majority concerning evolutionary computation. He is the author of six books, including Blondie24: Playing at the Edge of AI, 2002 and Evolutionary Computation: Toward a New Philosophy of Machine Intelligence (third edition). Dr. Fogel served as the founding editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Evolutionary Computation (1996-2002) and was the founding president of the Evolutionary Programming Society (1991-1993). He was elected a Fellow of the IEEE in 1999. Dr. Fogel has received numerous honors including the 2002 Sigma Xi Southwest Region Young Investigator Award, the 2004 IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Technical Field Award, and most recently the 2008 IEEE Computational Intelligence Society Evolutionary Computation Pioneer Award. Dr. Fogel will examine the self-worlds of intelligent machines and make comparisons to human and non-human animals.


Dr. Michael S. Gazzaniga

is professor of psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara where he heads the new SAGE Center for the Study of the Mind. Dr. Gazzaniga completed his B.S. at Dartmouth College and earned his Ph.D. in psychobiology at the California Institute of Technology, where he was also a post-graduate fellow for two years. He was awarded a National Institute of Health Fellowship at the Institute of Physiology in Pisa, Italy. Dr. Gazzaniga has held appointments at the University of California at Davis, Dartmouth Medical School, Cornell University Medical College, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, New York University Graduate School and the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Gazzaniga is president of the Cognitive Neuroscience Institute, and in 1993, he founded the Cognitive Neuroscience Society. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Neurological Association, the American Psychological Association, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He serves on the President's Council on Bioethics. He is also president of the American Psychological Society. He has published many books, notably The Ethical Brain, Mind Matters, The Social Brain and Nature's Mind. His many scholarly publications include the landmark 1995 book for MIT Press, The Cognitive Neurosciences, now in its third edition, which is recognized as the source book for the field. Dr. Gazzaniga will discuss how the self-world of humans differs from that of non-human animals.

 

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